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nadellii

Active member
Now that it is lent, I will be making this a lot. I bring it to lenten potlucks at my church and I make it all the time at home. Here's a recipe I use - I do change up the vegetables sometimes depending on what I can find. I might omit eggplant, for example, and I would replace it with two additional zucchini.

Ingredients:​

  • 2 medium zucchinis, sliced
  • 2 eggplants, sliced
  • 4 medium potatoes, peeled and sliced
  • 1 large red onion, sliced
  • 1 bell pepper (any color), sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 large ripe tomatoes, sliced or 1 can (14 oz) diced tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
  • 1 tbsp oregano, dried
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1/2 cup feta cheese, crumbled (optional)

Instructions:​

  1. Preheat your oven to 375°F (190°C) and lightly oil a large baking dish.
  2. Prepare the vegetables: Slice the zucchinis, eggplants, potatoes, onions, and bell peppers into even pieces. If using fresh tomatoes, slice them as well; otherwise, have your can of diced tomatoes ready.
  3. Layer the vegetables in the dish: Start with a layer of potatoes at the bottom, followed by eggplants, zucchinis, onions, bell peppers, and tomatoes. Sprinkle each layer with minced garlic, oregano, salt, and pepper. Repeat the layering process until all the vegetables are used.
  4. Season and oil: Once all the vegetables are layered, drizzle them with olive oil and add a final sprinkle of salt, pepper, and dried oregano. For a touch of freshness, add the chopped parsley over the top.
  5. Bake: Cover the dish with aluminum foil and bake in the preheated oven for about 45 minutes. After 45 minutes, remove the foil and continue baking for another 30 minutes, or until the vegetables are soft and slightly caramelized on the edges.
 
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Now that it is lent, I will be making this a lot. I bring it to lenten potlucks at my church and I make it all the time at home. Here's a recipe I use - I do change up the vegetables sometimes depending on what I can find. I might omit eggplant, for example, and I would replace it with two additional zucchini.

Ingredients:​

  • 2 medium zucchinis, sliced
  • 2 eggplants, sliced
  • 4 medium potatoes, peeled and sliced
  • 1 large red onion, sliced
  • 1 bell pepper (any color), sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 large ripe tomatoes, sliced or 1 can (14 oz) diced tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
  • 1 tbsp oregano, dried
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1/2 cup feta cheese, crumbled (optional)

Instructions:​

  1. Preheat your oven to 375°F (190°C) and lightly oil a large baking dish.
  2. Prepare the vegetables: Slice the zucchinis, eggplants, potatoes, onions, and bell peppers into even pieces. If using fresh tomatoes, slice them as well; otherwise, have your can of diced tomatoes ready.
  3. Layer the vegetables in the dish: Start with a layer of potatoes at the bottom, followed by eggplants, zucchinis, onions, bell peppers, and tomatoes. Sprinkle each layer with minced garlic, oregano, salt, and pepper. Repeat the layering process until all the vegetables are used.
  4. Season and oil: Once all the vegetables are layered, drizzle them with olive oil and add a final sprinkle of salt, pepper, and dried oregano. For a touch of freshness, add the chopped parsley over the top.
  5. Bake: Cover the dish with aluminum foil and bake in the preheated oven for about 45 minutes. After 45 minutes, remove the foil and continue baking for another 30 minutes, or until the vegetables are soft and slightly caramelized on the edges.
I love Briam! My family loves eating it cold or at room temperature, especially in the summer! For non-fasting days, it's amazing with feta, too!
 
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I love Briam! My family loves eating it cold or at room temperature, especially in the summer! For non-fasting days, it's amazing with feta, too!

Agreed, I love Briam with Feta too!

I don't like eggplant so I skip it and add more zucchini. Other than that, this recipe looks good!
 
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Reactions: Voula

Strict Lenten Fast Greek Salad

I have to prepare a salad for a lenten meal at church. Most people aren't super picky about it, as long as there are vegetables present.

Last time I prepared a salad, someone saw there was oil in the dressing and wouldn't touch the salad! So, I looked it up - and oil isn't allowed during lent for a strict fast. I had no idea.

How do I compose a salad for a crowd that caters to the strict fast?

I am thinking to make the salad and just use vegetables, nothing else.

Then, I can offer a regular dressing choice, and then also maybe just lemon wedges or some vinegar for the stricter fasters? Do you guys think that would work?

Best way to make saganaki?

I went to a restaurant the other day and they lit the saganaki on fire! When I make saganaki at home, I don't do that - mainly because my recipe doesn't call for it.

How does one incorporate the fire into creating the dish?

From what I can tell, the restaurant prepares the saganaki and then before they bring it out, I think they douse it in ouzo and let it with a torch on the way to the table.

It's a fun thing to watch. It kind of freaks me out at home - mainly because I would be merely guessing at this point. Any ideas?

Best Greek Wine Regions?

I'm on a quest to discover the finest vineyards Greece has to offer. With a winemaking history that spans over four millennia, it has a rich wine tradition even though a lot of people don't know much about it.

I'd love to hear from anyone who has explored Greek wine regions or from connoisseurs who have a particular fondness for Greek varieties. What regions should I place at the top of my list, and are there any specific vineyards or wines that are absolute must-trys?

From the famed Santorini Assyrtiko to the bold reds of Nemea, I'm eager to taste and learn about the exceptional flavors and story behind each bottle. Whether it's a little-known gem or an iconic estate, I'm all ears for your recommendations.

Can you make your own rusks?

I love Cretan Dakos!
There's something about the combination of the crunchy rusk soaked with the juice of ripe tomatoes, topped with fresh cheese and olive oil, that has me hooked!

However, given that I live in an area where it's challenging to find authentic Cretan rusks, I'm contemplating on whether I can bake my own at home. I'm curious if anyone here has attempted to make rusks suitable for dakos from scratch.

I know I can order then online. I tried this, and they didn't survive the shipping too well.

Most common seafood in Greece?

What is the most common seafood in Greece?

I recall having an abundance of delicious, fresh caught seafood but I can't remember the names of most of the fish. I had delicious octopus and that's the only thing I remember for sure.

I am going to Greece again - I thought I would try to figure what are some fish and other seafood, besides octopus, that I should look forward to?

I see octopus everywhere. I think I may have eaten fresh sardines at one point. Maybe some calamari and a different kind of lobster, too...
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