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auroracoor1

Active member
I just had lemon potatoes at a restaurant and although I know how to cook Greek food, somehow I have never made this!

I took my best guess (I didn't look up a recipe) and it didn't taste great. Basically, I made a Ladolemono, drizzled it on the potatoes, and roasted them.

They never really got crispy - so my next thought is that I put too much of the ladolemono.

So the next time I made them, I put less of the ladolemono. I couldn't really taste the lemon.

Next, I am going to look up a recipe, but meanwhile I am curious what you guys do to make these.
 
I just had lemon potatoes at a restaurant and although I know how to cook Greek food, somehow I have never made this!

I took my best guess (I didn't look up a recipe) and it didn't taste great. Basically, I made a Ladolemono, drizzled it on the potatoes, and roasted them.

They never really got crispy - so my next thought is that I put too much of the ladolemono.

So the next time I made them, I put less of the ladolemono. I couldn't really taste the lemon.

Next, I am going to look up a recipe, but meanwhile I am curious what you guys do to make these.
I start with raw potatoes, cut in chunks into a large roasting pan. I add water, olive oil, lemon juice, oregano, salt and grated lemon rind. Bake in a hot oven till crisp and the water has evaporated.
 
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I found a video that explains it better than I could! It's a whole process and from start to finish, each part of the process is important. Since it's out of the scope of how we understand making coffee in today's world, I thought the video would be best:

 
I start with raw potatoes, cut in chunks into a large roasting pan. I add water, olive oil, lemon juice, oregano, salt and grated lemon rind. Bake in a hot oven till crisp and the water has evaporated.
I do just about the same thing - I find that making ladolemono is a bit too much, as the oil sits kind of heavy. Just a light drizzle of olive oil is perfect. Typical ladolemono recipes have a bit too much oil because I find that enough "oils" come out of the chicken. So I would't use ladolemono, I'd do what Linda554 described.
 
Your method sounds delicious! I agree, sometimes keeping it simple with just a light drizzle of olive oil does the trick perfectly. Speaking of trying different cuisines, have you ever explored korean restaurant auckland? They offer a whole range of unique flavors and cooking techniques that could be a fun twist on your potato recipe experimentation!
 
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