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I love serving saganaki for some of my smaller dinner parties. This isn't a good recipe for me for a crowd because it is labor intensive. I thought I'd share my recipe!

Ingredients:

1 block of halloumi cheese
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon dried oregano
Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:

1. Preheat your skillet over medium heat and add a tablespoon of olive oil.

2. Cut the halloumi cheese into ½ inch slices and lightly coat with all-purpose flour.

3. Place the cheese in the skillet and fry until golden brown on both sides, about 2-3 minutes per side. Make sure to flip the cheese carefully to avoid breaking it.

4. Once the cheese is fully cooked, remove it from the skillet and place it on a plate.

5. Drizzle with lemon juice, sprinkle with oregano, salt, and pepper, and enjoy!

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This is a surprisingly easy dish to make. I love it when it's on fire when it comes off the stove BUT it freaks me out to do it. This looks like a great recipe!
 

Greek pita bread?

I like to make gyros at home but I am having a heck of a time finding the right bread for it where I live.

There is a store near me but they haven't been getting the bread I normally use in.

I thought maybe I would make my own - but I am not the best bread maker. I also don't trust recipes I see.

I don't want it to be the wrong kind of bread. I want it to be soft. I guess I have two questions -

1. maybe I can buy the bread online? Do you know where? and 2. Do you have a recipe you can recommend?

Learning about Greek wines

Greek wines offer a window into the country's rich traditions. I have been taking the time to learn more about it lately!

Greek wine history dates back over 4,000 years, intertwined with myths and traditions where wine was celebrated as a gift from the gods. Today, Greece's unique climate, diverse soils, and indigenous grape varieties contribute to the production of wines with distinct character and quality.

Indigenous Varieties to Know:
  1. Assyrtiko: Originally from Santorini, this white grape is all about minerality, crisp acidity, and lemony flavors, making it a perfect companion for seafood.
  2. Agiorgitiko: One of the most important red varieties, primarily grown in the Peloponnese. It produces wines ranging from soft and fruity to full-bodied and age-worthy.
  3. Xinomavro: Often referred to as the "Barolo of Greece," this red grape from Northern Greece offers complex aromas and a strong tannic presence, ideal for aging.
  4. Moschofilero: A highly aromatic white variety, yielding wines that are fresh and floral with lively acidity, hailing from the cool-climate region of Mantinia.
  5. Retsina: While not a grape variety, no discussion on Greek wine can be complete without mentioning Retsina, a traditional white or rosé wine flavored with pine resin. A contemporary approach to Retsina has given it a much-needed makeover, making it an intriguing option worth revisiting.

Did I miss any wines? I am guessing I did...

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What is tsipouro?

Today, I'm curious to learn more about a Greek spirit that's caught my attention — Tsipouro. Often mentioned alongside other legendary beverages like Ouzo, Tsipouro seems to be a significant part of Greek culinary and social tradition, yet it doesn't seem to have the same international fame.

From what little I've gathered, Tsipouro is a strong distilled spirit made from grape pomace, the residue left after wine production. But my understanding barely scratches the surface. I am curious first of all if this is the same thing as Raki on Crete. Also, on Crete I had Raki with honey - can you do that with Tsipouro?

tsipouro-greek-spirit.jpg

Corn Dishes from Greece

I noticed in Greece while I was there last that there is actually corn! Does it grow in Greece? I think I read somewhere that it grows in Northern Greece, but I have never been.

Does anyone know if there are some Greek traditional dishes that involve corn? I know that we can get street corn in the summer (and it's delicious), but I am not sure what Greeks would actually do with it. I am pretty sure it's not native to Greece, but I do see corn sometimes here and there on menus while in Greece.

Usually I am on the mainland when this happens, but like I said, I have never been to Northern Greece.

Favorite Greek Seafood?

I love Greek cuisine! I have learned that it many regions in Greece, seafood is a big part of the culinary traditions.

This got me thinking, and I'm curious to know—what's your favorite Greek seafood dish? Do you also have a favorite fish that you like to eat?

I'm eager to hear about your experiences and preferences!

Thanks in advance ...
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