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cubrinj

Active member
I have heard this festival described as an "Ancient Greek Thanksgiving" so I thought I would look it up. Very interesting! I don't see the "Thanksgiving" connection (not the way we in the US think of it) but I thought it was interesting because it goes to show you that gratitude-related festivals are an ancient concept. And it is a harvest festival, just like our US Thanksgiving is...

Some information I have gathered:

The Thesmorphia festival was celebrated on the 11th of Pyanepsion, which corresponds to late October or early November in the modern Gregorian calendar. The festival was a three-day affair, and it was observed mainly by women. During the festival, women were not allowed to sleep with their husbands, and purification rituals were performed at the temples of Demeter and Persephone. On the first day, the first fruits of the harvest were offered to Demeter, and a feast was held in her honor. On the second day, a procession was held, and women walked around the fields carrying torches, symbolizing the power of Demeter. The third day was a joyous celebration, and the remnants of the feast were donated to the poor.

The Thesmorphia festival was significant for many reasons. Firstly, it celebrated the end of the harvesting season, and it was a time to give thanks for a good crop. The festival was also a time for women to come together, and it was an opportunity for them to assert their power and influence in the society. Women played a significant role in the festival, and they were responsible for the preparation of the feast and various other aspects of the festival.

The festival was also significant in terms of its religious and mythological significance. Demeter was the goddess of agriculture, and Persephone was her young daughter, who was kidnapped by Hades, the god of the underworld. The story of Persephone reflects the cycle of life, death, and resurrection. The festival of Thesmorphia was an opportunity to honor these two goddesses and their mythology, which highlighted the importance of the harvest and the cycle of life.

Another reason why the Thesmorphia festival was significant was that it was a time for the community to come together and celebrate. The feast was an opportunity to share food, drink, and stories and build camaraderie amongst members of the community. During the festival, people forgot their differences and came together to celebrate the bounty of the harvest.
 
I found this really fascinating! I guess it makes sense, that other cultures have a "thanksgiving" sort of celebration. I wonder if people in Greece still honor something like this?
 

Thoughts on Oedipus Rex?

recently finished reading Oedipus Rex by Sophocles, and I’m curious to hear what others think about this classic tragedy.

For those who haven't read it, the story revolves around Oedipus, the King of Thebes, who is determined to rid his city of a plague by discovering and punishing the murderer of the previous king, Laius. As he delves deeper into the investigation, he uncovers harrowing truths about his own identity and his inadvertent fulfillment of a prophecy that he would kill his father and marry his mother.

It was an interesting read, to say the least. What do you guys think of it?

12 Olympian Gods and Goddesses

I love mythology and I thought I'd make list of the 12 Olympian Gods and Goddesses. This is my best guess. Do you know that I have seen different versions of this? What do you think?
  1. Zeus: The king of the gods, ruler of the sky and thunder, and the god of law, order, and justice.
  2. Hera: The queen of the gods, Zeus's wife and sister, and the goddess of marriage and childbirth.
  3. Poseidon: The god of the sea, earthquakes, and horses, often depicted with a trident.
  4. Demeter: The goddess of agriculture, fertility, and the harvest, responsible for the cycle of life and death in crops.
  5. Athena: The goddess of wisdom, warfare, strategy, and crafts, often associated with strategic warfare and civilization.
  6. Apollo: The god of music, poetry, prophecy, healing, and archery, known for his wisdom and beauty.
  7. Artemis: The goddess of the hunt, wilderness, childbirth, and virginity, often depicted with a bow and arrows.
  8. Ares: The god of war, violence, and bloodshed, embodying the brutal aspects of conflict.
  9. Aphrodite: The goddess of love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation, born from the sea foam and known for her irresistible charm.
  10. Hephaestus: The god of fire, blacksmiths, craftsmen, and volcanoes, renowned for his skill in metalworking.
  11. Hermes: The messenger of the gods, associated with travel, commerce, communication, and trickery.
  12. Dionysus: The god of wine, fertility, ecstasy, and theatre, representing the joyous aspects of life and celebration.
greek-gods.jpg

About Theogony by Hesiod

This poem has been one of my favorites for a while. I think everyone interested in Greek Mythology should read it! I thought I'd give you a summary:

Hesiod begins by invoking the Muses to guide him in recounting the story of the origins of the gods. He describes Chaos as the initial void from which the first gods emerged. From Chaos came Gaia (Earth), Tartarus (the Underworld), and Eros (Love), setting the stage for the creation of the cosmos.

Gaia gives birth to Uranus (the Sky), who becomes her husband and the father of the Titans, Cyclopes, and Hecatoncheires (Hundred-Handed Ones). Uranus, fearing the power of his offspring, imprisons them within Gaia's womb. Gaia urges her children to rebel, and her Titan son Cronus castrates Uranus, seizing power for himself.

Cronus becomes the ruler of the cosmos but fears a prophecy that one of his children will overthrow him. To prevent this, he swallows each of his children upon their birth, except for Zeus, who is saved by his mother Rhea and hidden away. Zeus grows up and defeats Cronus, establishing himself as the king of the gods.

The poem then describes the Titanomachy, the epic battle between Zeus and the Titans, which ends with the Titans' defeat and their imprisonment in Tartarus. Zeus and his siblings, the Olympian gods, become the rulers of the cosmos.

The narrative continues with the story of the Gigantomachy, the battle between the gods and the Giants, and other myths surrounding the gods' interactions with mortals and each other.

Information about Chaos from Greek Mythology?

I’m currently delving into Greek mythology and have become particularly fascinated with the concept of Chaos. From what I understand, Chaos is often described as the primeval void or the initial state of the universe before the creation of the cosmos. However, I’m looking for more detailed information on this topic.

Could anyone provide insights or resources on the following?
  • What are the origins of Chaos in Greek mythology, and what role does it play in the creation myths?
  • Are there specific ancient texts or authors that provide the most comprehensive descriptions of Chaos?
  • How is Chaos symbolically represented in Greek mythology, and what does it signify in the broader context of ancient Greek culture and philosophy?
  • Resources that you can recommend so I can dive in...
Thanks so much!

Understanding the Goddess Hera's Jealousy

I've been delving into Greek mythology recently, and one aspect that continually piques my interest is the jealousy of Hera, the queen of the gods. Hera's jealousy, particularly towards Zeus's numerous affairs and their resulting offspring, is a recurring theme in many myths.

I'm curious to hear your thoughts and interpretations on this. Why do you think Hera's jealousy is so prominently featured in these stories? Is it meant to reflect certain human qualities or societal norms of the time? Or is there another symbolic reason behind it?

Additionally, how do you think Hera's jealousy shapes her interactions with other characters and the overall narrative of Greek myths? Does it add a layer of complexity to her character, or does it serve more as a plot device?
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