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mj_toronto8

Active member
When Greeks feel happy and are dancing and have a good time, they've been known to smash plates. I've seen it! It's not just a tourist thing - but they don't do it much because I am sure they won't want to smash their expensive dish wear.

I was just at a wedding and they had purchased plates to smash - so basically they were cheap throwaway plates that actually smashed really well. I almost wonder if they were made for the purpose...

It got me thinking - where did this tradition come from? Does anyone know?
 
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I have no idea where it came from. I tried looking it up and couldn't find anything. Maybe someone can chime in!
 
I have no idea where it came from. I tried looking it up and couldn't find anything. Maybe someone can chime in!
I have been asking everyone if they know and everyone has a different explanation. It seems like one of those things that people enjoy creating stories about. I'll keep digging!
 

Greek Naming Traditions?

I have noticed that in Greece, there are some traditions associated with naming their children. Although some Greek families in the United States have done this, many have seemed to lose the traditions.

Does anyone know what some of these traditions are? I am helping a friend name his upcoming child... Here's some of what I have learned:

1. Firstborn daughter names after maternal grandmother
2. Firstborn son named after paternal grandfather
3. Firstborn son named after father

Those are the ones I have figured out. I don't know what is traditional from Greece and what has just been made up amongst Greeks in the US.

Learning about hospitality in Greece

I was trying to explain to some non-Greek friends about hospitality in Greece. I feel like it's next level, but how do you explain it?

Could anyone help me explain any of the following:
  • Traditional welcome gestures in Greece
  • Common household customs when visiting a Greek home
  • Etiquette for showing appreciation to Greek hosts
  • Any specific do's and don'ts that a foreigner should be aware of

How to find traditional Greek markets?

I'm planning a trip to Greece and am really excited about experiencing the local culture, especially the traditional markets. I've heard so much about the vibrant atmosphere, delicious food, and unique souvenirs, and I definitely don't want to miss out.

For those of you who have been to Greece or are familiar with the country, do you have any tips or recommendations on how to find the best traditional Greek markets? Are there specific cities or regions where these markets are more common?

Additionally, any advice on what to look out for or must-try items would be greatly appreciated!

Why Greeks Roast a Whole Lamb on the Spit on Easter Sunday?

A quote from excellent posting below!
"John, the author of one of the four Gospels, called Jesus the Lamb of God in John 1:29 and John 1:36. In the story, Abraham had to sacrifice an animal, such as a lamb or a ram, as an important part of the Jewish religion. People offered God restitution for the sins they committed.
However, Christians no longer need to engage in sacrifice because Christ died on the cross for their sins, thus becoming the sacrificial lamb."

Since Pascha, or Easter, is the day when we commemorate Jesus’ sacrifice, we eat lamb in remembrance of this selfless act
https://greekreporter.com/2024/05/0...ast+a+Whole+Lamb+on+the+Spit+on+Easter+Sunday

How to choose godparents?

I'm currently planning a baptism for a child in the Greek Orthodox Church and finding myself at a bit of a crossroads. One of the most significant decisions we're facing is choosing the right godparents. I understand that in our tradition, the role of a godparent is not only a great honor but also carries profound spiritual and moral responsibilities. They are to guide the child in the Orthodox faith, ensuring they grow in the church and its teachings.

How do you choose? I have a few candidates and am trying to narrow it down.
Share and discuss Greek traditions related to Greek weddings, christenings, dance & holidays!

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