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efhernandez_

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I would love to learn and play some Greek board games but I don't know of any!! Can any fellow Greeks help me out?
 
Tavli is the post popular .
 
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Tavli is the post popular .
Also known as backgammon, this is traditionally a game played, very fast with many different variations, by men in the cafes. However it’s been my favorite game for years and when you’re in Greece be sure to check out the tavli boards available for purchase….from inexpensive to beautifully hand-crafted in-laid boards.
 
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Also known as backgammon, this is traditionally a game played, very fast with many different variations, by men in the cafes. However it’s been my favorite game for years and when you’re in Greece be sure to check out the tavli boards available for purchase….from inexpensive to beautifully hand-crafted in-laid boards.
I would say this is the most traditional Greek game and the most popular as well
 
Tavli is the most popular game in Greece. Women und Men, chlildren und older play tavli,but at most the students.
Check the rules hier. Portes is the easier to learn. You can also online practice.
 
I think Tavli might have a few different rules from backgammon but it is pretty much the same game from what I understand. Interesting about the Greek version of monopoly, that is very cool!
 
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Tavli is the most popular game in Greece. Women und Men, chlildren und older play tavli,but at most the students.
Check the rules hier. Portes is the easier to learn. You can also online practice.
I've never heard of Portes!! Thanks
 
I think Tavli might have a few different rules from backgammon but it is pretty much the same game from what I understand. Interesting about the Greek version of monopoly, that is very cool!
Does Greek tavli only have one set of rules? Or are there different versions?
 
There are some Greek versions of board games we recognize, like Monopoly, and there is also Tavli...
 
For me, such a game is Dune II: The Battle for Arrakis. Another revolution in the game market. Although Herzog Zwei is considered to be the first strategy game of its kind, and one could certainly agree with that, Dune II was in every respect a much more mature product. Dune II was the first game to offer the classic RTS motifs. Mouse control? Here you go. Collecting raw materials to produce units and buildings? Here you go. But if you're more realistic and don't want to get into it like I did, you can play games with online casinos. Especially since, thanks to https://1houseofpokies.com/no-deposit-bonuses, you can take advantage of no deposit bonuses.
 
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Sometimes it strikes me how different the cultures of each of our countries are.
 
As a beginner diving into the world of Greek board games, I'm thrilled to stumble upon this thread! The discussion about popular Greek board games truly warms my heart. By the way, have you tried playing hearts? (Haha, pun intended).From classics like Tavli to modern gems like Santorini, there's a whole universe to explore. Each game seems to carry a piece of Greek culture and history, making the experience not just about winning but also about immersing oneself in the rich tapestry of Greek life. So, what's your take on these games? Any personal favorites or hidden gems you'd recommend? Let's keep the conversation rolling like the dice on a tavli board!
 

Ideas for Celebrating the New Month - Kalo Mina

Growing up, I heard my family say this all the time when there was a new month. I finally started paying attention to the tradition and ritual of saying it.

Kalo Mina actually means "Good Month" but my family took it a step further. We developed the habit of doing something special as a family to celebrate.It depends which day it falls. Some things we've done:

- Brunch - We do this if it falls on a weekend.
- Dinner - Going out to dinner is great any time of the year!
- Journaling - We've done family journaling parties, sitting together reflecting on the month. Sometimes we read aloud what we write (depends how the month went LOL)
- Goals - No matter if we do anything, like go out to dinner or brunch, we always sit and review our goals for the month together.

Netflix Show about Alexander the Great

I just noticed there was a show about Alexander the Great on Netflix. How is it?

I have been noticing some buzz that it's fairly controversial, but those who are unhappy about it ... I can't tell if they actually know about him, or if they are just upset about how he was depicted.

I am trying to figure out if I want to watch it so your honest reviews are welcome.

I have studied Alexander the Great a little bit and no a bit about his life, so I am sincerely hoping it's worth my time. I am between shows at the moment.

Tips for Learning and Teaching Greek

I know how to speak Greek okay, but I am not great at it. I want to brush up on my skills, and I also want to teach some of my family members. I am good enough at it to the learn the basics. I am looking for advice, but I've also compiled some ideas:

1. Spend an extended period of time in Greece

There’s no better way to learn Greek than to immerse yourself in the language and culture of Greece. If you have the opportunity, consider spending an extended time in Greece, studying or working, taking a sabbatical, or just exploring the country. Living in Greece can help you understand the nuances of the language, such as the different accents, dialects, and slang that are used. You’ll also have the chance to practice your Greek with locals, watch Greek TV or films, and read Greek books or newspapers. I would imagine this is the best way to learn fast!

2. Use a language program

If you can’t travel to Greece or you prefer a more structured approach to learning Greek, consider using a language program. There are many language programs available online or in your local area, ranging from self-paced courses to interactive classes. Some popular language programs for Greek include Rosetta Stone, Duolingo, and Pimsleur. From what I understand these are all great options and I can learn at my own pace.

3. Take classes

Taking classes is another excellent way to learn Greek, especially if you prefer face-to-face interaction and feedback. You can find Greek language classes in community colleges, universities, language schools, or private tutors. Taking classes can help you improve your Greek skills, such as listening, speaking, reading, and writing. You’ll have a teacher who can guide you through the learning process, answer your questions, and give you homework or assignments that challenge you. You’ll also have classmates who share your passion for Greek and can practice with you.

4. Find ways to immerse yourself outside of Greece

Even if you can’t go to Greece or attend classes, you can still immerse yourself in Greek in your daily life. One way is to find Greek-speaking communities or events in your area, such as cultural centers, festivals, or meetups. You can also use online resources to connect with Greek speakers, such as language exchange websites, social media groups, or chat apps. Listening to Greek music, watching Greek videos or podcasts, or reading Greek literature can also help you familiarize yourself with the sounds and patterns of the language.

Honestly, I plan to try all 4 - whatever I can do. I think it will all help.

Greek family customs - Personal related

Hi there. Not sure if this is the right forum, but I've got some personal issues with my family. My brother in law (73) is Greek. His wife (my sister) is not. They have a daughter (34) (my niece) that "sides" more with the Greek culture.

My niece has never left home, and has never paid rent or paid for food. She's been mostly jobless although she has worked a few jobs here and there. My sister is fed up with it, but when she confronts my BIL, he says "Greeks don't do that". And what he is implying (I guess) is that Greeks take care of their family in this way.

My BIL had a stroke many years ago and his health is declining rapidly. I am advocating for an attendant to come into the house every day and get him dressed, showered, make him meals, etc. My sister is 73 and she can't physically handle this. She also doesn't want to devote every waking moment to keeping an eye on him. When she suggests an attendant, again, "Greeks don't do that".

Now I'm pretty sure this is all BS, but would love to get some input from any Greek people in this forum.

Navigating Greek Lenten Fasting - Advice?

Lent is here and all my friends and family have been asking "what are you doing for lent this year?" They're all "giving something up" but I decided I wanted to fast. I would love your help and advice because this is the first time I am doing things in a stricter way. I resolve to see it through!

It's supposed to be a a time of reflection, purification, and preparation for the celebration of Easter, and the diet plays a significant part in this spiritual journey. I don't want to get so obsessed with the "rules" that I lose myself in them and forget why I am fasting int he first place.

Thanks in advance!
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