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acamp7

Active member
I went to a restaurant the other day and they lit the saganaki on fire! When I make saganaki at home, I don't do that - mainly because my recipe doesn't call for it.

How does one incorporate the fire into creating the dish?

From what I can tell, the restaurant prepares the saganaki and then before they bring it out, I think they douse it in ouzo and let it with a torch on the way to the table.

It's a fun thing to watch. It kind of freaks me out at home - mainly because I would be merely guessing at this point. Any ideas?
 
So, it's really not so bad, dousing the saganaki with ouzo and then setting it on fire. It's kind of fun! I would first try it in a controlled environment. Maybe near the sink in case you have a mishap - you'll have water nearby. Tip - use a kitchen torch with a long nose so you can keep a distance away from the fire - when the fire first hits it, it spurts upward kind of fast. I almost got my hair in the way.
 
So, it's really not so bad, dousing the saganaki with ouzo and then setting it on fire. It's kind of fun! I would first try it in a controlled environment. Maybe near the sink in case you have a mishap - you'll have water nearby. Tip - use a kitchen torch with a long nose so you can keep a distance away from the fire - when the fire first hits it, it spurts upward kind of fast. I almost got my hair in the way.

Agreed. The fire rushes up fast but it burns out fast. I would say make sure there's nothing in the way upwards that can burn. Great tip to do it by a sink!
 

Can you make your own rusks?

I love Cretan Dakos!
There's something about the combination of the crunchy rusk soaked with the juice of ripe tomatoes, topped with fresh cheese and olive oil, that has me hooked!

However, given that I live in an area where it's challenging to find authentic Cretan rusks, I'm contemplating on whether I can bake my own at home. I'm curious if anyone here has attempted to make rusks suitable for dakos from scratch.

I know I can order then online. I tried this, and they didn't survive the shipping too well.

Most common seafood in Greece?

What is the most common seafood in Greece?

I recall having an abundance of delicious, fresh caught seafood but I can't remember the names of most of the fish. I had delicious octopus and that's the only thing I remember for sure.

I am going to Greece again - I thought I would try to figure what are some fish and other seafood, besides octopus, that I should look forward to?

I see octopus everywhere. I think I may have eaten fresh sardines at one point. Maybe some calamari and a different kind of lobster, too...

Roundup of Easy Recipes to Start Cooking Greek Food

I know a lot of people who want to start cooking Greek food but are intimidated. I want to help them out by brainstorming a list of "easy win" foods to get started making.

Here's what I have - do you have anything to add?

  • Greek Village Salad (Horiatiki)
  • Tzatziki
  • Greek Lemon Chicken
  • Greek Lemon Potatoes
  • Souvlaki
  • Greek yogurt with honey and walnuts
  • Grilled Halloumi cheese
  • Fasolakia
  • Briam
  • Greek style lamb chops

How does this fasolada recipe look?

Does anyone have any idea if the ingredients list in this fasolada recipe looks good? I want to make it soon - seems like a good lenten meal to me.

  • 1 cup dried white beans (such as Great Northern or navy beans), soaked overnight
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 2 carrots, diced
  • 2 celery stalks, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 can (14 oz) diced tomatoes
  • 4 cups vegetable stock
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Chopped fresh parsley for garnish
  • Optional: lemon wedges for serving

I am questioning the lemon and the garlic - I never put both lemon and garlic together. Also, I have never used stock before, I usually put tomato paste in it. But this recipe has diced tomatoes so I am questioning if the stock is necessary.

Best way to make saganaki?

I went to a restaurant the other day and they lit the saganaki on fire! When I make saganaki at home, I don't do that - mainly because my recipe doesn't call for it.

How does one incorporate the fire into creating the dish?

From what I can tell, the restaurant prepares the saganaki and then before they bring it out, I think they douse it in ouzo and let it with a torch on the way to the table.

It's a fun thing to watch. It kind of freaks me out at home - mainly because I would be merely guessing at this point. Any ideas?
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