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kcixcy

Active member
I went to Greece and loved the Bougatsa I used to buy on the street. I thought I would share a recipe I found. I have never made it before. Does this look like the real deal? I don't want to dive in, only to realize the recipe was flawed from the beginning.

Ingredients​

For the Custard:​

  • 4 cups whole milk
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup fine semolina
  • 4 large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • Zest of 1 lemon (optional)

For the Assembly:​

  • 1 package (about 1 pound) phyllo dough, thawed
  • 1 cup unsalted butter, melted
  • Confectioners' sugar, for dusting
  • Ground cinnamon, for dusting

Instructions​

Preparing the Custard:​

  1. In a medium saucepan, combine the milk and half the sugar over medium heat. Bring to a simmer, stirring occasionally to dissolve the sugar.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together the remaining sugar and semolina. Add the eggs and whisk until the mixture is smooth and pale.
  3. Gradually temper the egg mixture by adding a cup of the warm milk while whisking constantly. Then, slowly pour the egg mixture back into the saucepan with the remaining milk, whisking continuously.
  4. Cook the mixture over low heat, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, until it thickens and coats the back of the spoon (about 10-15 minutes). Remove from heat, stir in the vanilla extract and lemon zest (if using), and set aside to cool slightly. Cover with plastic wrap directly on the surface of the custard to prevent a skin from forming.

Preparing the Phyllo:​

  1. Preheat your oven to 350°F (175°C). Lightly grease a 9x13 inch baking dish.
  2. Carefully unroll the phyllo dough. Cover the sheets with a damp towel to prevent drying out.
  3. Lay one sheet of phyllo in the prepared dish and brush with melted butter. Repeat this process, layering and buttering each sheet until you have used about half of the phyllo.
  4. Pour the custard over the phyllo layers, spreading evenly.

Assembly and Baking:​

  1. Continue layering and buttering the remaining phyllo sheets on top of the custard.
  2. Using a sharp knife, score the top layers of phyllo into pieces – this will make cutting the bougatsa easier after baking.
  3. Bake for 45-50 minutes, or until the phyllo is golden brown and crisp.
  4. Remove from the oven and allow to cool for a few minutes.
  5. Before serving, sift generously with confectioners' sugar and sprinkle with cinnamon to taste.
 
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I went to Greece and loved the Bougatsa I used to buy on the street. I thought I would share a recipe I found. I have never made it before. Does this look like the real deal? I don't want to dive in, only to realize the recipe was flawed from the beginning.

Ingredients​

For the Custard:​

  • 4 cups whole milk
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup fine semolina
  • 4 large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • Zest of 1 lemon (optional)

For the Assembly:​

  • 1 package (about 1 pound) phyllo dough, thawed
  • 1 cup unsalted butter, melted
  • Confectioners' sugar, for dusting
  • Ground cinnamon, for dusting

Instructions​

Preparing the Custard:​

  1. In a medium saucepan, combine the milk and half the sugar over medium heat. Bring to a simmer, stirring occasionally to dissolve the sugar.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together the remaining sugar and semolina. Add the eggs and whisk until the mixture is smooth and pale.
  3. Gradually temper the egg mixture by adding a cup of the warm milk while whisking constantly. Then, slowly pour the egg mixture back into the saucepan with the remaining milk, whisking continuously.
  4. Cook the mixture over low heat, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, until it thickens and coats the back of the spoon (about 10-15 minutes). Remove from heat, stir in the vanilla extract and lemon zest (if using), and set aside to cool slightly. Cover with plastic wrap directly on the surface of the custard to prevent a skin from forming.

Preparing the Phyllo:​

  1. Preheat your oven to 350°F (175°C). Lightly grease a 9x13 inch baking dish.
  2. Carefully unroll the phyllo dough. Cover the sheets with a damp towel to prevent drying out.
  3. Lay one sheet of phyllo in the prepared dish and brush with melted butter. Repeat this process, layering and buttering each sheet until you have used about half of the phyllo.
  4. Pour the custard over the phyllo layers, spreading evenly.

Assembly and Baking:​

  1. Continue layering and buttering the remaining phyllo sheets on top of the custard.
  2. Using a sharp knife, score the top layers of phyllo into pieces – this will make cutting the bougatsa easier after baking.
  3. Bake for 45-50 minutes, or until the phyllo is golden brown and crisp.
  4. Remove from the oven and allow to cool for a few minutes.
  5. Before serving, sift generously with confectioners' sugar and sprinkle with cinnamon to taste.
Your recipe looks pretty good! My bougatsa recipe is a bit different in that I bake it in a thin pan, because bougatsa is traditionally made thin, not thick like Galaktoboureko. My recipe is tried and trusted, if you'd like to give it a try! Plus I have lots of tips and tricks for making it a success!
 
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Your recipe looks pretty good! My bougatsa recipe is a bit different in that I bake it in a thin pan, because bougatsa is traditionally made thin, not thick like Galaktoboureko. My recipe is tried and trusted, if you'd like to give it a try! Plus I have lots of tips and tricks for making it a success!
I like it in a thin pan, too! But I agree, the original recipe that kcixy posted looks pretty good to me! Thank you.
 
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Reactions: Voula

Most common seafood in Greece?

What is the most common seafood in Greece?

I recall having an abundance of delicious, fresh caught seafood but I can't remember the names of most of the fish. I had delicious octopus and that's the only thing I remember for sure.

I am going to Greece again - I thought I would try to figure what are some fish and other seafood, besides octopus, that I should look forward to?

I see octopus everywhere. I think I may have eaten fresh sardines at one point. Maybe some calamari and a different kind of lobster, too...

How to learn about different regional cuisines in Greece?

I have learned so much about Greek cuisine by being on this forum! I know that there are standard recipes that everyone seems to cook.

For example, you can get souvlaki all over. Everyone seems to serve a village salad with slight variations. Most regions seem to make moussaka. There are tons of others.

I have also noticed that each region has their own specialties. How do you go about learning about them?

greek-salad.jpg

Greek Halva Recipe to Enjoy During Lent?

I love Halva year round but I often see it a lot during Lent. My recipe doesn't seem Lent friendly to me. Any ideas on how I can adapt it?

Ingredients:
  • 1 cup semolina
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup chopped almonds or walnuts (optional)
  • 1/4 cup raisins (optional)
Instructions:
  1. In a medium-sized saucepan, melt the butter over medium heat.
  2. Add the semolina to the melted butter and stir continuously for about 5-7 minutes, or until the semolina turns golden brown and begins to emit a nutty aroma.
  3. While stirring the semolina mixture, gradually add the sugar and continue to cook for another 2-3 minutes until the sugar is fully incorporated.
  4. Slowly pour in the water, stirring constantly to avoid lumps from forming. Be careful as the mixture may splatter.
  5. Reduce the heat to low and continue stirring the mixture until it thickens to a porridge-like consistency, about 5-7 minutes.
  6. Stir in the ground cinnamon and optional chopped nuts and raisins, if using.
  7. Remove the saucepan from the heat and let the halva rest for a few minutes to thicken further.
  8. Serve the halva warm or at room temperature, either as a dessert or a sweet breakfast treat.

Greek methods of food preservation?

I remember my family doing some things to preserve food as I was growing up but we got away from them. The thing is, some of the options were actually delicious! My yiayia made sun-dried tomatoes, spoon sweets, her own tomato paste, etc. It was one of the things that made her food delicious.

I am trying to figure out what she did! I am curious if anyone knows anything about the following:

- Traditional Techniques: I know the ancient Greeks did a lot of preserving and some of the methods translate to modern?
- Modern Adaptations to Old Techniques: Maybe to make the process easier?
- Local Variations: Are there different regional things?

How does this fasolada recipe look?

Does anyone have any idea if the ingredients list in this fasolada recipe looks good? I want to make it soon - seems like a good lenten meal to me.

  • 1 cup dried white beans (such as Great Northern or navy beans), soaked overnight
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 2 carrots, diced
  • 2 celery stalks, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 can (14 oz) diced tomatoes
  • 4 cups vegetable stock
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Chopped fresh parsley for garnish
  • Optional: lemon wedges for serving

I am questioning the lemon and the garlic - I never put both lemon and garlic together. Also, I have never used stock before, I usually put tomato paste in it. But this recipe has diced tomatoes so I am questioning if the stock is necessary.
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