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ssherie_

Active member
When buying Greek olive oil, do you buy different ones for different purposes?

I've been researching the best Greek olive oils. Now, I'm curious if any of you out there go to the lengths of selecting specific Greek olive oils for, say, salads, cooking, or even dipping with bread?

In my findings, extra virgin olive oil seems to be the go-to for dressings and cold dishes, while virgin olive oil can handle a bit of heat for light sautéing. And then there's the refined olive oil that's suggested for frying due to its higher smoke point. But, I've also heard a few people swear by the intense flavor of the unfiltered olive oil.

What's your experience with Greek olive oils, and do you have any personal favorites or secrets to what types work best for different recipes? Can you genuinely taste the difference in quality and type, or am I just overthinking my pantry staples? Would love to hear your thoughts on the matter!
 
I usually just buy whichever olive oil from Greece looks like the highest quality that I can find. I do prefer to taste it before I buy because by the time it gets to the United States where I am, it may have lost some of its magic in transit. Or it may simply be old. I can taste it when it's a bit off!

I have a Greek market near me, and they seem to always get some pretty good olive oil - so if I trust the store, I don't always need to sample.
 
I usually get my olive oil from Greece. I have my uncle who has an olive grove and he send me two or three 18 liter tins. So I use that for everything. Some friends who don’t have that privilege buy a good quality greek olive oil for cooking and if they want to use it on their salads they buy a really good Greek Evoo.
 

Corn Dishes from Greece

I noticed in Greece while I was there last that there is actually corn! Does it grow in Greece? I think I read somewhere that it grows in Northern Greece, but I have never been.

Does anyone know if there are some Greek traditional dishes that involve corn? I know that we can get street corn in the summer (and it's delicious), but I am not sure what Greeks would actually do with it. I am pretty sure it's not native to Greece, but I do see corn sometimes here and there on menus while in Greece.

Usually I am on the mainland when this happens, but like I said, I have never been to Northern Greece.

Cooking Greek Style Octopus

One of the things I like about Greek cuisine is the octopus! It's so tender and flavorful. I get it a lot when I am in Greece and only a few times in the United States. I want to learn how to do that. In particular I want to know:
  • Choosing the Right Octopus: What should I look for when buying octopus? Are there any specific types or sizes that work best?
  • Tenderizing Process: I’ve heard that tenderizing the octopus is crucial. What methods do you recommend? I’ve heard of everything from beating it to simmering it in a pot. What works best?
  • Cooking Techniques: Should I grill it, bake it, or cook it in a stew? I'm aiming for something that's traditionally Greek.
  • Marination and Seasonings: What are the best herbs, spices, or marination techniques to use? I know olive oil and lemon are staples, but are there any other must-have seasonings?
Any advice you can give is welcome!

What are your favorite vegetarian foods in Greek cooking?

Greek cooking is renowned for its \use of fresh herbs, vegetables, and grains, making it a paradise for those who prefer plant-based meals. Yet, when we think of Greek cuisine, dishes like gyros and souvlaki often take the spotlight. But there's so much more to Greek food than meat-centric dishes, and I'm on a quest to discover your favorite vegetarian delights that Greece has to offer!

From the creamy delicacies such as fava and tzatziki to hearty mains like gemista (stuffed tomatoes and peppers) and spanakopita (spinach pie), I'm eager to learn about the dishes you've fallen in love with. Perhaps you have a cherished recipe passed down through generations, a memorable meal from a trip to Greece, or even a favorite Greek vegetarian dish you've mastered at home.

Feel free to share your thoughts! My personal favorites are lentil soup, spanakorizo, and tzatziki (but this isn't a vegan choice)... I know some vegetarians can have dairy.

Thanks in advance!

Traditions associated with Greek coffee?

When I visit people in Greece, it usually involves Greek coffee, a cold glass of water, and whatever sweets there are around - like Loukoumi, spoon sweets, fruit.. it seems like it's all about hospitality and spending time together, while sharing the bounty of what you have.

One time, a yiayia actually did a "reading" using coffee grounds. I didn't understand all the Greek, but the reading was fun and lighthearted and I wondered how she decided what to say.

Do you guys have similar experiences? The social aspect has been a big part of it for me.

What is tsipouro?

Today, I'm curious to learn more about a Greek spirit that's caught my attention — Tsipouro. Often mentioned alongside other legendary beverages like Ouzo, Tsipouro seems to be a significant part of Greek culinary and social tradition, yet it doesn't seem to have the same international fame.

From what little I've gathered, Tsipouro is a strong distilled spirit made from grape pomace, the residue left after wine production. But my understanding barely scratches the surface. I am curious first of all if this is the same thing as Raki on Crete. Also, on Crete I had Raki with honey - can you do that with Tsipouro?

tsipouro-greek-spirit.jpg
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