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paharo45

Active member
Is it a myth that most Greeks like their lamb well done?

I ask because in my family - we tend to like it medium well or medium. We all feel that well one lamb is too tough!

With lamb shank it is a different story.

We make leg of lamb a lot, as well as lamb souvlaki and lamb chops. Especially with the souvlaki, well done doesn't taste as good to me.

It's hard to gauge how long to cook a leg o lamb, and I find I naturally gravitate towards pieces that are more on the medium side. Are we the exception not the rule?
 
Is it a myth that most Greeks like their lamb well done?

I ask because in my family - we tend to like it medium well or medium. We all feel that well one lamb is too tough!

With lamb shank it is a different story.

We make leg of lamb a lot, as well as lamb souvlaki and lamb chops. Especially with the souvlaki, well done doesn't taste as good to me.

It's hard to gauge how long to cook a leg o lamb, and I find I naturally gravitate towards pieces that are more on the medium side. Are we the exception not the rule?
My mother always cooked lamb well done, and it was dry and a tad tough. Then when I started cooking it was medium . Then I began grilling a leg. And my prep was marinate overnight after boning and cutting into what looked like a steak. The leg was grilled to a medium/medium rare. It was and still is delicious. My marinade is: 1/4 cup each olive oil and red wine, then spices oregano, thyme, rosemary
 
Greek-Americans eat meat between rare and well done.. the way you're cooking meat is the American way.. Greeks in Greece prefer all meat well done, including lamb - it's a cultural thing.
 
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Greek-Americans eat meat between rare and well done.. the way you're cooking meat is the American way.. Greeks in Greece prefer all meat well done, including lamb - it's a cultural thing.
This is my understanding too. In the United States, Americans think that meat has to be slightly undercooked in order to not be dried out.

In my experience, this isn't true at all. When one takes the extra step to baste the meat throughout the cooking process if roasting, marinate the meats, etc then it creates a succulence that you don't get if you don't take these extra steps.

The last leg of lamb I grilled I actually marinated it in ladolemono overnight and cooked it well done. People who normally like their meat rare or medium rare couldn't get over how it was cooked all the way through and wasn't dried out.
 

Does this look like a good koliva recipe?

I am planning a memorial service coming up in about two weeks. The person who makes the koliva for everyone in the church is going to be out of town, and I can't find another person to do it. So I thought I'd make it.

I found this recipe - does it look like it would work?

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups whole wheat berries
  • 1/2 cup powdered sugar
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts
  • 1/4 cup sesame seeds
  • 1/4 cup chopped almonds
  • 1/4 cup golden raisins
  • 1/4 cup black raisins
  • 2 tbsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp ground cloves
  • Garnish: pomegranate seeds, whole almonds, and powdered sugar

Instructions:

  1. Preparing the Wheat:
  • Rinse the wheat berries thoroughly in a strainer under cold running water.
  • Place the wheat in a large pot and add water until it's about 2 inches above the wheat level.
  • Bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and simmer for about 2 hours, or until they are tender but not mushy, adding more water as necessary.
  • Drain the wheat and spread it out on a towel or a large baking tray to dry out completely, preferably overnight.
  1. Toasting Ingredients:
  • Preheat your oven to 350°F (175°C).
  • Spread the sesame seeds on a baking sheet and toast in the oven for about 5-8 minutes, till golden; be vigilant as they can burn quickly.
  • Repeat this process with the almonds and the walnuts, ensuring each is nicely toasted but not burnt.
  1. Mixing the Koliva:
  • Once the wheat is dry, combine it in a large bowl with powdered sugar, toasted walnuts, toasted sesame seeds, toasted almonds, golden and black raisins, cinnamon, and cloves.
  • Stir the mixture gently to combine.
  1. Assembling the Dish:
  • Mound the mixture onto a large serving platter, shaping it into a dome with your hands or a spoon.
  • Decorate the top with whole almonds and pomegranate seeds creating a cross or other religious symbols as is traditional.
  • Just before serving, sift powdered sugar over the top to cover.

Greek pita bread?

I like to make gyros at home but I am having a heck of a time finding the right bread for it where I live.

There is a store near me but they haven't been getting the bread I normally use in.

I thought maybe I would make my own - but I am not the best bread maker. I also don't trust recipes I see.

I don't want it to be the wrong kind of bread. I want it to be soft. I guess I have two questions -

1. maybe I can buy the bread online? Do you know where? and 2. Do you have a recipe you can recommend?

Favorite Greek Seafood?

I love Greek cuisine! I have learned that it many regions in Greece, seafood is a big part of the culinary traditions.

This got me thinking, and I'm curious to know—what's your favorite Greek seafood dish? Do you also have a favorite fish that you like to eat?

I'm eager to hear about your experiences and preferences!

Thanks in advance ...

What foods do you like to eat in Greece?

I thought I would make a list of all the foods I love eating in Greece. What are your favorites? Here's my list:
  • Saganaki - love this hot cheese dish!
  • Octopus (grilled) - I can't seen to find the good stuff outside of Greece.
  • Horta - love the mix of greens they use in Greece.
  • Fasolakia - the fresh ingredients make this stunning
  • Gyro - I love gyros in Greece the best
What do you love to eat in Greece?

Different Types of Feta Cheese?

Whenever I buy feta cheese from different places, it tastes slightly different. Does anyone know why? I know that there are specific rules for creating feta cheese, so what is responsible for his differential in flavor and texture?

Is it possible that a place (for example a restaurant) may not actually be buying "Greek" feta? Meaning, could it be a situation where they aren't following the rules and are making a feta-like cheese using different milks, etc? Perhaps it isn't from Greece?

I truly only like Greek feta as far as I know. How can the other places call it feta if they're not following the rules?

greek-feta-cheese.jpg
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