1 - 4 of 4 Posts

nm1999

Active member
I am going to be attending a wedding in Greece and am trying to gather information.

Someone in another thread I started about Greek wedding traditions said that Greeks typically give money at a wedding.

Do you know how I would figure out how much to give? What's customary?

Thanks in advance!
 
50 euros is probably standard, but it really depends on how well you know the couple and what you and afford to give.. I've heard of people giving 20 euros because they don't know the couple or have much money, but others may give 100 euros.

Our wedding in Greece (1 year ago) had only people from Greece invited and a handful of people from the USA. Most people gave us 100 euros, but there were a few who gave less and a few who gave more...
 
  • Like
Reactions: k_tsoukalas
50 euros is probably standard, but it really depends on how well you know the couple and what you and afford to give.. I've heard of people giving 20 euros because they don't know the couple or have much money, but others may give 100 euros.

Our wedding in Greece (1 year ago) had only people from Greece invited and a handful of people from the USA. Most people gave us 100 euros, but there were a few who gave less and a few who gave more...
I would do the same - weddings in Greece are very different than what we are used to in the United States!
 
Attending a wedding in Greece sounds exciting! When it comes to giving money as a gift, it's common in Greek culture, but the amount can vary depending on factors like your relationship with the couple and your financial situation. As a guideline, consider giving an amount that covers the cost of your meal and a bit more as a token of celebration. It's always thoughtful to give what feels comfortable for you, rather than feeling pressured to match a specific amount. If you need to make more money for the wedding, maybe try exploring games for cash app? It's an interesting way to potentially earn some extra income, but be sure to research thoroughly before diving in.
 
Last edited:

Navigating Greek Lenten Fasting - Advice?

Lent is here and all my friends and family have been asking "what are you doing for lent this year?" They're all "giving something up" but I decided I wanted to fast. I would love your help and advice because this is the first time I am doing things in a stricter way. I resolve to see it through!

It's supposed to be a a time of reflection, purification, and preparation for the celebration of Easter, and the diet plays a significant part in this spiritual journey. I don't want to get so obsessed with the "rules" that I lose myself in them and forget why I am fasting int he first place.

Thanks in advance!

How do I learn traditional Greek dance?

I've recently developed an interest in traditional Greek dance and would love some advice on how to get started. I've seen videos of dances like the Syrtaki and Kalamatianos, and they look both fun and challenging. I'm not sure where to begin, though.

Does anyone have recommendations for learning resources, such as books, online tutorials, or instructional DVDs? Are there particular dances that are best for beginners? Additionally, I'm curious if there are any local dance groups or cultural organizations that might offer classes or workshops. I'm especially interested in experiencing the community aspect of Greek dance, so any advice on finding dance events or festivals would be greatly appreciated.

Why Greeks Roast a Whole Lamb on the Spit on Easter Sunday?

A quote from excellent posting below!
"John, the author of one of the four Gospels, called Jesus the Lamb of God in John 1:29 and John 1:36. In the story, Abraham had to sacrifice an animal, such as a lamb or a ram, as an important part of the Jewish religion. People offered God restitution for the sins they committed.
However, Christians no longer need to engage in sacrifice because Christ died on the cross for their sins, thus becoming the sacrificial lamb."

Since Pascha, or Easter, is the day when we commemorate Jesus’ sacrifice, we eat lamb in remembrance of this selfless act
https://greekreporter.com/2024/05/0...ast+a+Whole+Lamb+on+the+Spit+on+Easter+Sunday

Thinking about the Greek way of hospitality...

I thought I would ask your thoughts oh Philoxenia - or the Greek way, or art, of hospitality. I noticed this when I travel in Greece. People are so kind, they often go out of the way for us, when I feel that they don't have to! How can one describe this to someone?

From what I understand, Philoxenia is not merely a practice but a deeply ingrained value within Greek culture that extends far beyond the simple act of hosting. It reflects a genuine, heartfelt welcome to strangers, treating them with the same respect and generosity one would show to a dearly beloved friend. This beautiful tradition, passed down through generations, turns the act of hosting into an art form, embodying warmth, respect, and a profound sense of human compassion. There have been so many stories I can think of...

This thought process was triggered because we were watching My Big Fat Greek Wedding 3 - someone in the village had taken on a Syrian refugee. Is this a Greek hospitality thing? Philoxenia?

Greek Easter Holy Week Liturgies!

Share and discuss Greek traditions related to Greek weddings, christenings, dance & holidays!

WorldwideGreeks.com is a free online forum community where people can discuss Greek food, travel, traditions, history and mythology.
Join Worldwide Greeks here!

JOIN COMMUNITY FOR FREE

LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT
Back
Top