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francescool

Active member
Greeks are so open hearted and willing to help you out that you don't need to know many Greek words when visiting Greece, they will try to help you and you will usually find a common understanding. Some basic words that might be helpful to know are...

Thank you = efxaristo
Hello and goodbye = ya
How are you? = ti kaneis?
Good = kala
Where is... = pou eene

I suggest that you check out google translate or some YouTube videos so you can see how to actually pronounce some of these words. It is difficult to understand from the spelling as a non native speaker.
 

This Greek Evzone was made in the USA!

This makes me so proud and happy to see that people are connecting with their heritage from miles away and willingly doing the military service to serve their country. Bravo to the soldier and those that are like him. I can't wait to go to Athens again and visit the tomb of the unknown soldier.

My favorite Greek love poem!

Greek poetry is some of the best around the world! I've been reading it for years, and this poem still stands to be one of my favorites. Let me know what you think, and of course share your favourites in the forum :)

Ode to Aphrodite:

Aphrodite, subtle of soul and deathless,
Daughter of God, weaver of wiles, I pray thee
Neither with care, dread Mistress, nor with anguish,
Slay thou my spirit!

But in pity hasten, come now if ever
From afar of old when my voice implored thee,
Thou hast deigned to listen, leaving the golden
House of thy father

With thy chariot yoked; and with doves that drew thee,
Fair and fleet around the dark earth from heaven,
Dipping vibrant wings down he azure distance,
Through the mid-ether;

Very swift they came; and thou, gracious Vision,
Leaned with face that smiled in immortal beauty,
Leaned to me and asked, "What misfortune threatened?
Why I had called thee?"

"What my frenzied heart craved in utter yearning,
Whom its wild desire would persuade to passion?
What disdainful charms, madly worshipped, slight thee?
Who wrongs thee, Sappho?"

"She that fain would fly, she shall quickly follow,
She that now rejects, yet with gifts shall woo thee,
She that heeds thee not, soon shall love to madness,
Love thee, the loth one!"

Come to me now thus, Goddess, and release me
From distress and pain; and all my distracted
Heart would seek, do thou, once again fulfilling,
Still be my ally!

Here is the link https://www.sacred-texts.com/cla/pos/pos08.htm

Did you know about the Greek New Years tradition of hanging onions on doors?

In Greece, there are many different New Year's traditions and some of them vary by location and the specific culture of the region. Most of them bring good luck and health for the new year, especially this onion tradition. Across all of Greece, families will hang a yellow onion on their door as a symbol of good luck. They will usually do this after the church service on New Year's Day. While not all families do this, you may see it next time you visit Greece in January, look out for it!

What is considered taboo in Greek culture?

Every culture has their taboos and stuff that isn't really talked about or normalized. I am wondering what is considered taboo in Greece, and what I should avoid bringing up, or maybe only bring up with caution. Or if there's anything that I should avoid doing because I don't wanna offend anyone. Thank you so much, your advice is very much appreciated. I think it's very important to know these things before travelling to any country!

What are your favorite wedding favors?

Traditional Greek weddings usually give wedding favors called koufeta, which are traditional chocolate candies. Nowadays, many people will skip the koufeta and have additional and more modern favors. I have seen small pots of honey or a small bottle of ouzo, which I thought was really nice. What are some Greek wedding favors that you have seen and that you have liked?
Share and discuss Greek traditions related to Greek weddings, christenings, dance & holidays!

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