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paharo45

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There are too many philosophers to count, but these are the ones I am studying at the moment. It's fascinating to me how influential the Greek philosophers are. Here's some things I am learning:

#1 Socrates

If philosophy had a poster boy, Socrates might very well be it. The father of Western philosophy, Socrates was a gadfly to Athenian society, questioning everything and Master to Plato. Known for the Socratic Method and his unflinching commitment to truth, Socrates' influence is immeasurable despite never having written a word.

#2 Plato

Rightly succeeding his mentor on this list, Plato's Academy saw him birth the first "university" of its kind. His unabashed idealism, immortal Forms, allegories like the Cave, and the pursuit of 'The Good' in moral philosophy set the stage for much intellectual discourse.

#3 Aristotle

Aristotle, another of Plato's students, had a more grounded approach to philosophy than his predecessor. With establishing principles of logic and reason, and contributions to virtually every field of academia, from poetry to physics, Aristotle's body of work remains foundational.

#4 Heraclitus

Heraclitus, famed for the idea that "change is the only constant," viewed the cosmos through a lens of process, flux, and an everlasting Logos that governs the world. Although little of his work survives, his influence on ancient and modern thinkers is profound.

#5 Epicurus

Known for his eponymous philosophy, Epicurus taught that the greatest good is to seek modest pleasures in order to attain a state of tranquility, freedom from fear (ataraxia), and absence of bodily pain (aponia). Often misunderstood, Epicureanism is starkly different from the modern use of 'epicurean' - it's much less about a luxury lifestyle and more about ethical considerations regarding personal fulfillment.
 
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This is a great collection of philosophers but you're right. There's so many more! Here are my favorites:
  • Socrates - Often considered the father of Western philosophy, he famously proclaimed, "I know that I know nothing," emphasizing the virtue of wisdom in acknowledging one's own ignorance.
  • Plato - A student of Socrates, known for his works such as "The Republic," which looked at justice and the ideal state, and his theory of Forms or Ideas.
  • Aristotle - The pupil of Plato and tutor to Alexander the Great, his extensive writings cover topics ranging from metaphysics to biology, poetics to politics.
But let's not forget the likes of Diogenes with his cynic approach to life, Pythagoras for his contributions beyond the famous theorem, Epicurus for his thoughts on pleasure and simplicity, and Zeno for his paradoxes and founding of Stoicism.
 
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Of course, Aristotle brings a different flavor to the mix, with his more grounded approach and contributions to pretty much every field imaginable.

Heraclitus, now there's a thinker who's often overlooked but shouldn't be. His idea that change is constant is something I've been reflecting on a lot lately. It's such a profound concept.

And then there's Epicurus – his philosophy of seeking tranquility through modest pleasures really resonates with me. It's all about finding that inner peace and contentment, which feels especially important in today's hectic world.

By the way, if you're still exploring philosophical rabbit holes like I am, I recently stumbled upon this fascinating thing called the Pythagoras AI Oracle. It's like a whole new way of looking at yourself through numbers and personality traits.
 
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Learning about the Olympic Games

It's an Olympics year so I thought I would chat a bit about the Olympic Games!

The original Olympic Games, held in Olympia, Greece, were primarily a festival celebrating Zeus, the king of the Greek gods. These games began around 776 BC and featured a range of athletic competitions, from foot races to combat sports like wrestling and boxing. Interestingly, the games were so significant that wars were put on hold, and conflicts paused to allow athletes and spectators to travel safely to Olympia. This ancient tradition of the Olympic Truce or "Ekecheiria" is a testament to the power of sport in fostering peace and unity, a principle that remains at the heart of the Olympics today.

I find it absolutely intriguing how these ancient games laid the groundwork for the modern Olympics, introducing concepts of sportsmanship, excellence, and the idea of bringing people together through the universal language of sport.

Has anyone visited ancient Olympia? Do you guys enjoy watching the Olympic Games?

Information About the Dorian Invasion

I recently came across a reference to the "Dorian Invasion" while reading about ancient Greek history, and I'm curious to learn more about this event. From what I understand, it seems to have been a significant period of upheaval, but the details are still a bit unclear to me.

Could anyone provide a detailed explanation or point me toward some reliable resources?

I'd appreciate any insights, book recommendations, or articles that could help me learn about it. Thanks in advance for your help!

Question about Greece during WWI

I am trying to learn more about Greek history. This is a family project! What I am learning about now is Greece's involvement in WWI. From what I've gathered, Greece had a rather complex and interesting stance during World War I, but I'm looking for more in-depth information.

Could anyone here provide insights or point me towards resources that detail:

  1. Greece's political climate leading up to its involvement in WWI.
  2. The significance of the National Schism and how it affected Greece's participation.
  3. Key battles or military campaigns that Greek forces were involved in.
Thanks so much!

History of the Greek flag?

I never really stopped to think about the history of the Greek flag and I want to share that knowledge with my kids. I need to figure out what it is first. I have this feeling the history is rich because I've seen different, older versions of the flag.

Could anyone shed some light on the following aspects:
  • Origins: When was the Greek flag officially adopted, and were there any significant events that led to its creation?
  • Symbolism: What do the colors and the cross represent? Are there any historical or cultural significance behind these elements?
  • Evolution: Has the flag undergone any changes throughout the years? If so, what prompted these changes?
  • Legends/Myths: Are there any interesting legends or anecdotes surrounding the inception or adoption of the flag?
Thanks!
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