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ssherie_

Active member
I'm currently planning a trip to Greece and am passionate about making my travel as sustainable and eco-friendly as possible. Given the beauty and historical significance of Greece, I want to ensure that my visit contributes positively to the environment and local communities there.

Does anyone have any tips or experiences they could share on sustainable travel practices in Greece? I'm looking for advice on everything from eco-friendly accommodations, sustainable dining options, to ways of exploring the country that minimize my carbon footprint. Also, if there are specific activities or tours that support local conservation efforts or communities, I'd love to hear about those too!
 
I'm currently planning a trip to Greece and am passionate about making my travel as sustainable and eco-friendly as possible. Given the beauty and historical significance of Greece, I want to ensure that my visit contributes positively to the environment and local communities there.

Does anyone have any tips or experiences they could share on sustainable travel practices in Greece? I'm looking for advice on everything from eco-friendly accommodations, sustainable dining options, to ways of exploring the country that minimize my carbon footprint. Also, if there are specific activities or tours that support local conservation efforts or communities, I'd love to hear about those too!


Using a donkey for travel in Greece could potentially minimize the carbon footprint compared to using motorized vehicles, depending on various factors.

1. **Emissions**: Donkeys do not emit greenhouse gases like cars or other motorized vehicles. Thus, using a donkey would be more environmentally friendly in terms of direct emissions.

2. **Fuel Consumption**: Donkeys do not require fuel like cars or other motorized vehicles. This means they do not consume fossil fuels, which are major contributors to carbon emissions.

3. **Feed**: Donkeys primarily consume vegetation like grass and hay. If these food sources are locally sourced and sustainably produced, the carbon footprint associated with their feed could be lower than fossil fuel production and transportation for motorized vehicles.

4. **Terrain and Distance**: Donkeys are well-suited for certain terrains, such as mountainous or rugged areas, where motorized vehicles might not be as efficient or practical. If the journey is short and the terrain is suitable, using a donkey could indeed be a sustainable mode of travel.

However, there are also factors to consider:

1. **Animal Welfare**: Using animals for transportation raises ethical concerns regarding their welfare. Ensuring that the donkeys are well cared for, not overburdened, and provided with proper rest and nourishment is essential.

2. **Travel Time**: Traveling with a donkey might take longer than using motorized vehicles, especially for long distances. This could impact the practicality of using a donkey for specific journeys.

3. **Infrastructure**: The availability of suitable infrastructure for donkey travel, such as trails or paths, could also affect the feasibility of using them as a mode of transportation.

In summary, while using a donkey for travel in Greece could potentially minimize the carbon footprint compared to motorized vehicles, it's essential to consider factors such as animal welfare, travel time, and infrastructure before determining its practicality and sustainability for specific journeys.
 
That's awesome that you're focusing on sustainable travel for your trip to Greece.
One great way to reduce your carbon footprint is to stay at eco-friendly accommodations like Los Altos Resort, which prioritize sustainability.
When it comes to dining, look for restaurants that source local, organic ingredients and minimize food waste. Exploring the country by public transportation, biking, or walking can also reduce your impact. Consider joining tours or activities that support local conservation efforts or communities.
 
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Best places in Greece to see the Venetian influences?

I am interested in the Venetian influences that are interwoven into certain parts of the country. From the architecture to the local customs, I understand that the reach of the Venetian Republic left a notable mark that can still be felt today.

I'm in the midst of planning an itinerary focused on exploring these influences and I’d love to hear from you about the must-visit spots where one can best experience the essence of the Venetian presence in Greece.

Do any of you have recommendations for specific towns, buildings, ruins, or even local festivities that embody this cultural blend? Any hidden gems or lesser-known locations that surprised you with their Venetian charm?

Of course, I expect Crete, with its famed Venetian fortresses and the romantic old town of Chania, to be part of this list. But I'm certain there is a wealth of places, perhaps on other islands or on the mainland, which equally showcase this unique period of history. I also know there are influences in Corfu. Is there anywhere else?

Question about scuba diving in Greece

I'm currently planning a trip to Greece, a destination that has long been on my bucket list, not just for its history and cuisine, but especially for the scuba diving experiences it offers. I've heard that Greece boasts some incredible underwater landscapes, from vibrant marine life to fascinating wrecks.

Given the vastness of Greece's coastline, I thought I would try to see the country in a different way.

Let's say I want to go scuba diving in a particular island. How do I go about doing it?

When does tourist season end in Greece?

I am planning my next Greek trip.

I want to go in October but the people I am traveling with - we won't be able to to go until mid-October.

I have been to Crete that late in the year and to Athens, but not anywhere else. On our schedule is to visit some of the smaller islands, like Hydra.

Do places like that shut down? My main concern is, will the tourist shops be closed? I love to browse through them and it's part of my enjoyment.

Canyoning Bled Slovenia

Hi guys!!
I'm planning to take a group canyoning Bled but apparently, it is obligatory to use a local guide. I am a canyon instructor (caf and ffme), is this enough to supervise without anyone else? I have several years of experience (climbing and canyoning) and it is obvious that I will not be able to offer this destination if it is not possible.
Thanks in advance

Pack List for Trip to Greece in Spring

I have a trip to Greece planned in the spring. Mainly, I want advice on the weather. In the meantime, I made my best guess and came up with a list. Anything to add or subtract?

Clothing
  • A light rain jacket or windbreaker: For the inevitable April showers
  • A couple of long-sleeve shirts: For those cooler mornings
  • A lightweight sweater: For layering when temperature changes
  • A pair of comfortable pants: Think breathable fabrics like cotton, and a pair of jeans.
  • Shorts and a sundress: For warmer afternoons
  • Comfortable walking shoes: You’ll be exploring villages and ancient ruins, so cushioned soles are a must.
Accessories
  • A versatile scarf: Can double as a shawl on cooler evenings
  • A wide-brimmed hat: For sun protection
  • Sunglasses and sunscreen: Essential for beach days
  • Reusable water bottle: To stay hydrated without contributing more waste
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