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efhernandez_

Active member
Drop them in the thread below!! Mine is Oxi day of course!!
 
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xmelissaa

Member
Oxi Day is a great one! I would say the Greek War of Independence, I love learning about it
 
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Worldwide Greeks Editor

Administrator
Staff member
I agree 100% OXI Day has to be the best moment in Greek history!

186102612.jpeg
 

k_tsoukalas

Moderator

Kristi

New member
Of course OXI day❤️🙏🙏🙏
 

amygdalE

Member
Drop them in the thread below!! Mine is Oxi day of course!!
There are so many important moments! As I take "history" as "Universal (not simply Political) History", my favorite moment is the moment when the Ionian Anaximander started thinking Peri Physeis (About Physis), these words being the title of a book he wrote and were later translated into Latin as De Natura, Natura (Nature) being the realm of whatever is born, emerges, or develops. This was the moment when philosophy was born, namely the search for true knowledge, whose history will include science (or Galileo's "Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences" -- bodies of true knowledge -- today known as Physics and Science of Materials). The Anaximandrian Physics, which was not experimental, is rather a cosmo-genesis that was prompted by his teacher Thales. Thales held that things are born from water [the fertile Sea] but held that the world is full of [causative] gods, whereas Anaximander's world is autonomous -- a concept that will held by all the Greek philosophical physicists. // Anax. did not invent Physis, which was already in his language! SO, my view: philosophy cannot arise in any culture, since it is pursued through language, rather than in a vacuum or by contact with that which is being investigated. The entities of a language make a whole difference. [This is Value # 1 of the Greek Language; I'm omitting the other values, besides the normal/obvious Communication.] [Sorry, Aristotle: Anax., not Thales. is the first philosopher. You, too, are a physicist.]
 
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There are so many important moments! As I take "history" as "Universal (not simply Political) History", my favorite moment is the moment when the Ionian Anaximander started thinking Peri Physeis (About Physis), these words being the title of a book he wrote and were later translated into Latin as De Natura, Natura (Nature) being the realm of whatever is born, emerges, or develops. This was the moment when philosophy was born, namely the search for true knowledge, whose history will include science (or Galileo's "Dialogues Concerning Two New Sciences" -- bodies of true knowledge -- today known as Physics and Science of Materials). The Anaximandrian Physics, which was not experimental, is rather a cosmo-genesis that was prompted by his teacher Thales. Thales held that things are born from water [the fertile Sea] but held that the world is full of [causative] gods, whereas Anaximander's world is autonomous -- a concept that will held by all the Greek philosophical physicists. // Anax. did not invent Physis, which was already in his language! SO, my view: philosophy cannot arise in any culture, since it is pursued through language, rather than in a vacuum or by contact with that which is being investigated. The entities of a language make a whole difference. [This is Value # 1 of the Greek Language; I'm omitting the other values, besides the normal/obvious Communication.] [Sorry, Aristotle: Anax., not Thales. is the first philosopher. You, too, are a physicist.]
A philosophy fan I see, which Greek philosophers do you recommend reading?
 

amygdalE

Member
A philosophy fan I see, which Greek philosophers do you recommend reading?
More than a fan, I spent years studying it (and more time on my own). What I liked most was a graduate course on the ancient Greek philosophy. I recommend "The Presocratics", a collection of the fragments of the philosophical writings before Socrates, which are mostly quotations by other authors, It includes Anaximander, the Pythagoreans, Heraclitus, Parmenides, etc.) Then: any or all of Plato's "Dialogues", some of which are called Socratic since they are conversations in the style of the historic Socrates (who never wrote anything) and inquiries about subjects [virtues, love (in the "Symposium"), the soul, etc.] dear to him, while others represent Plato's own inquiries: the "Republic" [Politeia] and, in addition to others, my favorite, the "Theaetetus" (on perception and true knowledge). I love also many works written by the Stoics and their Roman followers, especially Cicero. Aristotle and the Stoics for the creation of Logic! [Logic is he art or science of correct/rational reasoning and argumentation. Related: the study of fallacies -- blunders of the mind, many of which, says Aristotle, are due to the misuse of... guess: language.]
 
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What are your favorite Greek inventions?

Mine is the water mill hands down! This revolutionized so many things and made a huge impact!! What is your favorite Greek invention?

water-mill-720x480.jpg

The Greek debt crisis explained

Im not sure if this is the best representation because im not an economist, but just something to help others get a better idea of what happened in 2008 and what Greece is recovering from. We've been through a lot as a culture and a country but we've remained so strong!

Aristoteles: Opposite of Ökonomik

Hi,

or oeconomica, its Ökonomik in German. He sees this a as what we would call working economy, all/most get better.
The opposite for him is capitalism, a few get better, most get worse. I am looking for the word for this. Itis something like Thanatomia, from Thanatos, death.
Not "Chrematistik", being able to enrich yourself. Thanks!

Any ideas?

Oedipus Rex by Sophocles is my favorite Ancient Greek play

This classic tragedy is still read and performed today. In the play, a father leaves his own son, Oedipus, to die in a field. Rather than die, he is taken in by another family and raised. While with this family, Oedipus is told by an Oracle that he will murder his father and sleep with his mother. Despite his best efforts to prevent this from happening, he does both of these things.

Did you know that the anchor was invented in Ancient Greece?

Prior to the Ancient Greeks, ancient ships would often throw large stones that were tied with ropes over the side of the boats to keep them steady. Even though this did work up to a point, it didn’t work all that well. No matter how heavy the stone was, it would still drift slightly in the ocean. The Ancient Greeks solved this problem by created the first real anchors, which they often referred to as “teeth”, or ὀδὁντες in the original Greek. These first anchors were made from buckets that were filled with stones. These buckets would grab onto the dirt at the ocean floor, thus keeping the ship in plate. Because each ship had several of these anchors, it made the ship even steadier. Even when there was a place to tie the boat to, the anchors were still used to provide extra stability.
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