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blopez34

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Does anyone know what the role of the fates was? Thanks :)
 

Janus - God of Beginnings

I learned recently of Janus, the Roman God of Beginnings. The month January, I believe, is named after this God.

Many of the Roman Gods and Goddesses have Greek counterparts. Does Janus?

If so, I think that would be an interesting god to learn about. I have to be honest - I am not sure there is a counterpart. I have been searching but there either isn't enough information online, or there really is no equivalent.

Do you guys have any idea?

Summary of the Nine Muses of Greek Mythology

I've been studying about Greek Mythology and I bumped into some information about the 9 muses. I thought I would give a summary of who they are and what they represented. I feel like the Muses are often forgotten!

In Greek mythology, the Muses were goddesses who presided over the arts and sciences, inspiring creativity and knowledge in humans. There were originally nine Muses, each with her own domain of expertise. Here's a summary of who they were:
  1. Calliope: The Muse of epic poetry and eloquence. She was often depicted with a writing tablet or a scroll.
  2. Clio: The Muse of history. She was often depicted holding a scroll or a set of tablets, symbolizing the recording of historical events.
  3. Euterpe: The Muse of music, song, and lyric poetry. She was often depicted holding a flute or a double flute.
  4. Thalia: The Muse of comedy and bucolic poetry. She was often depicted with a comic mask, a shepherd's crook, or a wreath of ivy.
  5. Melpomene: The Muse of tragedy. She was often depicted holding a tragic mask and a sword or club.
  6. Terpsichore: The Muse of dance and choral poetry. She was often depicted holding a lyre and dancing.
  7. Erato: The Muse of love poetry and lyric poetry. She was often depicted holding a lyre and a wreath of roses.
  8. Polyhymnia: The Muse of sacred poetry, hymns, and eloquence. She was often depicted in a pensive or meditative pose, sometimes holding a finger to her lips.
  9. Urania: The Muse of astronomy and astrology. She was often depicted holding a globe and a compass, symbolizing the study of celestial bodies and their movements.
Together, the Muses served as sources of inspiration for poets, musicians, artists, and scholars, guiding and nurturing creative endeavors in ancient Greek culture.

muses-greek-mythology.jpg

Learning About Dionysius

I have recently been studying about Dionysius. I feel like I hav been forgetting about him! Beyond the basics that he is the Greek god of wine, festivity, and ecstatic celebration, I’m eager to peel back the layers and understand his role and significance across different cultures and historical epochs.

What piqued my interest initially was how Dionysius seems to embody a dual nature – both bringing joy and chaos. This duality, along with his followers, rituals, and the influence on arts and culture, presents a fascinating study. I am particularly interested in the Dionysian festivals!

Curious to hear people's thoughts...

Sad and Interesting Story of Prometheus

I find the story of Prometheseus to be sad and interesting and I wanted to share. Yes, I like to study Greek mythology - I find it so fascinating!

Prometheus, a Titan in Greek mythology, occupies a unique space in the pantheon of myths due to his intelligence and his profound impact on human civilization. His tale is one marked by valor, insubordination, and enduring punishment, a narrative that has fascinated scholars and enthusiasts for ages.

Prometheus, whose name aptly means "forethought", was known for his wisdom and for being a champion of mankind. Unwilling to see humans suffer, he committed a daring act of defiance against Zeus, the king of the gods, which would forever alter the course of human history.

The most famous aspect of Prometheus’ story involves him stealing fire from the gods and gifting it to humanity. Fire, in Greek mythology, represents more than just a means to warm food or fend off the darkness; it symbolizes knowledge, technology, and enlightenment—tools that would empower humanity to shape their world, for better or worse.

Zeus, infuriated by Prometheus' transgression, sentenced him to a severe and enduring punishment. Prometheus was bound to a rock, where each day an eagle, the emblem of Zeus, was sent to eat his liver, which would then regrow overnight, only for the torment to repeat ad infinitum. It was an eternal punishment for a being who, in many accounts, acted out of compassion and foresight.

I find it sad that he did something so beneficial to humanity but then got punished for it.

Aphrodite - Greek Goddess of Love

Ahead of Valentine's Day, I thought I'd share some things that I thought were interesting about Aphrodite, the Greek Goddess of love:

1. Aphrodite Was Born from Sea Foam.
In Greek mythology, it's said that Aphrodite was born from the sea foam that formed when Cronus cut off Uranus's genitals and threw them into the ocean. As the spirit of desire and physical attraction, Aphrodite's birth story reflects the power of nature and the irresistible force of passion.

2. She Was Married to Hephaestus.
Despite her reputation as the goddess of love and beauty, Aphrodite had a less-than-romantic marriage with Hephaestus, the god of blacksmiths and volcanoes. Hephaestus was unattractive and had a limp, and Aphrodite had several affairs with other gods and mortals. To me, this seem like an unlikely match.

3. She Possessed a Magic Girdle.
To make herself even more desirable and seductive, Aphrodite had a magic girdle that could make anyone fall in love with her. It's said that she used this girdle to win the hearts of both gods and mortals and cause conflicts and jealousy among them.

4. She Had Children with Several Gods and Mortals.
Aphrodite was famous for her many love affairs, and she had children with several gods and mortals. Her most famous son was Eros, the god of love and passion, who was sometimes depicted as her lover as well.

5. She Was Worshiped throughout Ancient Greece.
As the goddess of love and beauty, Aphrodite was a popular deity throughout ancient Greece and was worshiped in many cities and temples. She was also associated with fertility, sexuality, and even war, as seen in her role as a protector of soldiers and sailor.

6. Her Symbols Included Doves, Roses, and Mirrors.
Like most deities, Aphrodite had several symbols that represented her qualities and powers. Her most common symbols were doves, roses, and mirrors, which reflected her beauty, love, and vanity.
Share and discuss Greek mythology!

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