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francescool

Active member
This is one of the saddest stories in Greek history. 48 years ago on July 15, 1974, Turkey invaded Cyprus and displaced and killed huge portions of the Greek populations and it continuously illegally occupies northern Cyprus to this day. To this day, there are abandoned Greek homes in Northern Cyprus that people are never able to return to. There is still a UN occupied border between Cyprus and Turkish occupied Cyprus, which is one of the only UN occupied borders left in the world.
 

mastichas09

Active member
This is one of the saddest stories in Greek history. 48 years ago on July 15, 1974, Turkey invaded Cyprus and displaced and killed huge portions of the Greek populations and it continuously illegally occupies northern Cyprus to this day. To this day, there are abandoned Greek homes in Northern Cyprus that people are never able to return to. There is still a UN occupied border between Cyprus and Turkish occupied Cyprus, which is one of the only UN occupied borders left in the world.
This story is so sad to hear, here is a link if anyone wants to learn more. https://mfa.gov.cy/turkish-military-invasion-and-occupation.html
 
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For Ancient Greeks, Our Modern Democracy is an Oligarchy.

History of the tradition of decorating boats for Christmas

One of the most interesting Greek Christmas traditions to me is the one where people decorate boats. So, I started to research the history. Here's a bit of what I discovered:

The roots of the tradition of decorating boats in Greece for Christmas can be traced back to the country's longstanding ties with the sea. In Ancient Greece, people would often looked to the sea for both sustenance and inspiration, and it was not uncommon for ships to be adorned with religious symbols and decorations.

It also has ties to early Christianity in Greece. According to Greek Orthodox beliefs, Saint Nicolas (aka Santa Claus) was a sailor, and he is the patron saint of sailors. Decorating boats is often seen as a way to honor him.

Over time, this practice became associated with the Christmas season, and the boats began to be decorated specifically for the holiday.

People also make paper boats to decorate. Some call these the "yule boat" or karavaki. One of the most famous examples of this practice is the Yule boat, or karavaki.

The earliest known evidence of decorating boats for Christmas in Greece dates back to the 19th century. During this time, sailors would deck out their boats with lights and tiny boats. These tiny boats were often placed inside the larger boat, symbolizing protection from harm while at sea.

Does anyone have anything to add?

Favorite Philosopher from Ancient Greece

I love studying philosophy - I have some favorites - do you have yours? Here is a short list:

I like each of them for different reasons...
  • Plato
  • Socrates
  • Epicurus
  • Zeno of Citium
  • Aristotle

What is Oxi Day?

I am most knowledgeable about the cuisine of Greece. I love to cook, and I learned how to make traditional Greek foods from my family.

Food is what we discussed, talked about, and enjoyed together over the years.

We barely talk about history - so when I happened to learn about Ohi Day in passing by poking around some Greek sites, I was surprised it wasn't talked about in my household growing up.

I want to know more about Ohi Day and why we celebrate. Any advice as to where to start?

Studying the Trojan War - Was it Real?

Did the Trojan War really happen? I am doing a bit of research and wanted to know what you guys thought:

The war is believed to have happened around 1200 BCE, and while there is no concrete evidence to support its occurrence, it is widely accepted as factual.

What is confusing me is how prevalent it is in Greek Mythology. In addition to the gods' involvement in the conflict, various stories and legends were added over time to give the tale more depth and drama. For example, the character of Achilles was said to be invulnerable except for his heel, which led to the phrase "Achilles heel" being used to describe a person's one weakness.

While some scholars once dismissed the Trojan War as pure myth, modern archaeological evidence has suggested that it may have been a real event. Excavations at the ancient site of Troy have revealed evidence of a long period of conflict and destruction, and historians have found similarities between the tale as it is told in ancient texts and what is known about the region's history at the time. While many details of the Trojan War are still shrouded in mystery, it seems increasingly likely that it was not just a legend but a real event that has been passed down through the ages.
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