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kosta_karapinotis

Active member
All the braised lamb shank I have ever eaten has fallen off the bone - and that is why it is so delicious!

So, I tried to make it thinking it would be foolproof.

Something went wrong - it was tough and rubbery. I am wondering if it is something I did, or if maybe the lamb was a bit tougher than I would have liked.

I asked around and one thing someone asked me is if I cooked it enough. I didn't know how to answer that since I followed the directions, and I got the recipe from a family member whose lamb shank I always enjoyed. What do you think?

Some things to know:

- I am not sure I initially seared the meat long enough
- I held back on the salt in the recipe
- I was forced into using a larger shank than the recipe called for because I couldn't find smaller ones
 
I will agree with you that you might have not cooked it enough. Yes the size of the meat would definitely affect the cooking time. also keep in mind that each o en reacts and cook differently. Your oven might not been at the right temperature even though u had it on the temp that the recipe says.
I would say definitely try it again. And cook it low (temp) and slow (longer time)
 
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I will agree with you that you might have not cooked it enough. Yes the size of the meat would definitely affect the cooking time. also keep in mind that each o en reacts and cook differently. Your oven might not been at the right temperature even though u had it on the temp that the recipe says.
I would say definitely try it again. And cook it low (temp) and slow (longer time)
Thank you, Pemi. I'll try this next time and let you know how it goes!
 
I agree with trying to cook it longer! Great advice :)
 

What are your favorite vegetarian foods in Greek cooking?

Greek cooking is renowned for its \use of fresh herbs, vegetables, and grains, making it a paradise for those who prefer plant-based meals. Yet, when we think of Greek cuisine, dishes like gyros and souvlaki often take the spotlight. But there's so much more to Greek food than meat-centric dishes, and I'm on a quest to discover your favorite vegetarian delights that Greece has to offer!

From the creamy delicacies such as fava and tzatziki to hearty mains like gemista (stuffed tomatoes and peppers) and spanakopita (spinach pie), I'm eager to learn about the dishes you've fallen in love with. Perhaps you have a cherished recipe passed down through generations, a memorable meal from a trip to Greece, or even a favorite Greek vegetarian dish you've mastered at home.

Feel free to share your thoughts! My personal favorites are lentil soup, spanakorizo, and tzatziki (but this isn't a vegan choice)... I know some vegetarians can have dairy.

Thanks in advance!

What are 5 ingredients of Greek cuisine you can't live without?

I am working on stocking a better pantry for cooking Greek foods, but I thought I'd do something fun.

I would love it if you could share with me your top five staple ingredients for Greek cuisine and maybe a little but about why.

I am going to share mine to get things started:

1. Feta Cheese - Of course! Greek food wouldn't be the same.
2. Phyllo - I have learned that I won't make my own, so I have to keep it on hand.
3. Greek olive oil - I should have put this first! I can't live without olive oil lol
4. Greek oregano - I bring a bunch back from Greece or order it online when I run out. Nothing beats it!
5. Greek olives - I like to keep 2-3 different types on hand - I get these from a local Greek store.

What are your choices?

greek-pantry-items.jpg

Greek pita bread?

I like to make gyros at home but I am having a heck of a time finding the right bread for it where I live.

There is a store near me but they haven't been getting the bread I normally use in.

I thought maybe I would make my own - but I am not the best bread maker. I also don't trust recipes I see.

I don't want it to be the wrong kind of bread. I want it to be soft. I guess I have two questions -

1. maybe I can buy the bread online? Do you know where? and 2. Do you have a recipe you can recommend?

Different Types of Feta Cheese?

Whenever I buy feta cheese from different places, it tastes slightly different. Does anyone know why? I know that there are specific rules for creating feta cheese, so what is responsible for his differential in flavor and texture?

Is it possible that a place (for example a restaurant) may not actually be buying "Greek" feta? Meaning, could it be a situation where they aren't following the rules and are making a feta-like cheese using different milks, etc? Perhaps it isn't from Greece?

I truly only like Greek feta as far as I know. How can the other places call it feta if they're not following the rules?

greek-feta-cheese.jpg

Traditions associated with Greek coffee?

When I visit people in Greece, it usually involves Greek coffee, a cold glass of water, and whatever sweets there are around - like Loukoumi, spoon sweets, fruit.. it seems like it's all about hospitality and spending time together, while sharing the bounty of what you have.

One time, a yiayia actually did a "reading" using coffee grounds. I didn't understand all the Greek, but the reading was fun and lighthearted and I wondered how she decided what to say.

Do you guys have similar experiences? The social aspect has been a big part of it for me.
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