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nadellii

Active member
I like to make gyros at home but I am having a heck of a time finding the right bread for it where I live.

There is a store near me but they haven't been getting the bread I normally use in.

I thought maybe I would make my own - but I am not the best bread maker. I also don't trust recipes I see.

I don't want it to be the wrong kind of bread. I want it to be soft. I guess I have two questions -

1. maybe I can buy the bread online? Do you know where? and 2. Do you have a recipe you can recommend?
 
I grew up in a Greek family and we never had pita bread. Maybe it's a regional thing, but hadn't even heard of it until last 10 years or so. Bread we got at Greek store was round and somewhat high with sesame seeds on top and we called it psomi, the Greek word for bread.

Is pita bread popular in Greece? It's been a while since I've been to Greece and never had pita bread at any Greek restaurants, nor do I recall any family members serving it.
 
I grew up in a Greek family and we never had pita bread. Maybe it's a regional thing, but hadn't even heard of it until last 10 years or so. Bread we got at Greek store was round and somewhat high with sesame seeds on top and we called it psomi, the Greek word for bread.

Is pita bread popular in Greece? It's been a while since I've been to Greece and never had pita bread at any Greek restaurants, nor do I recall any family members serving it.

Same with me! I didn't get introduced to Gyros and Pita Bread until later in life. We'd go to the Greek bakery and get either the Greek white bread or the country bread.

In Greece, as far as I can see, it is just used in Gyros and for Gyro plates (basically a deconstructed Gyro with everything on the plate and not contained in a sandwich).

The Greek Pita is soft, thick so it can hold the ingredients, and folds nicely without breaking. Basically, it's very hard to find in the US. I don't make Gyros at home, though, so Greek Pita Bread is not a concern of mine. LOL

I tried making it once and it wasn't a good experience.
 

Favorite Greek comfort foods?

I'm curious to know: what are your favorite Greek comfort foods?

Personally, I've heard a lot about moussaka and spanakopita, but I haven't had the chance to try them yet. Do you have any recommendations or recipes for these dishes? Or perhaps there are other less-known but equally delicious Greek comfort foods I should be aware of?

Looking forward to hearing your favorites and any tips you have for making or finding these comforting dishes!

Tips for Baking Greek Bread?

Does anyone have any tips or secrets for baking Greek bread at home? Here are a few specific areas where I could use some advice - I am new to baking bread, and most Greek breads I have had taste different than other breads I've had - so I am guessing there are nuances I need to learn.
  1. Are there specific types of flour or yeast that are essential for authentic Greek bread?
  2. Any particular methods that work best for achieving the right dough consistency?
  3. How long should the dough be left to rise, and are there any tricks to getting the perfect rise?
  4. Ideal oven temperature and baking times?
  5. Any traditional additives or spices that can elevate the bread?
I appreciate any insights or experiences you all could share!

What makes Greek yogurt so special?

I've recently started seeing Greek yogurt everywhere—from grocery store aisles to recipes and even fitness blogs. It seems like it's become a major trend, but I'm curious to know more about it. What makes Greek yogurt so special compared to regular yogurt? Does it really offer more nutritional benefits, or is it just a fad?

I’ve heard it has a thicker texture and is higher in protein, but I’d love to hear from people who regularly consume it or have done their own research. Are there particular brands you recommend? Any specific health benefits or potential downsides I should be aware of?

Different kinds of Greek salads?

I love horiatiki when I go to Greece - but I also noticed other types of salads being served.

Do they have names?

I tried one or two of them and most of them involved greens - like lettuce, etc.

Are they just the invention of the restaurant or are they common dishes? I guess it's hard to truly know unless I can share examples from restaurants, but Id didn't think to take pics last time I was in Greece.

Greek Grilled Pita Bread - A Recipe

I love to grill - it's that time of year! I grilled some souvlaki the other day and decide to also make some pita bread. I had the dough all prepped. It came out great and tasted good with the souvlaki. Here's the recipe:

Ingredients:​

  • 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (plus extra for dusting)
  • 1 1/2 cups warm water (about 110°F)
  • 2 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

Instructions:​

  1. Activate the Yeast:
    • In a small bowl, combine the warm water, sugar, and yeast. Stir gently and let it sit for about 5-10 minutes until it becomes frothy.
  2. Prepare the Dough:
    • In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour and salt.
    • Make a well in the center of the flour and pour in the yeast mixture and olive oil.
    • Mix with a wooden spoon or your hands until the dough starts to come together.
  3. Knead the Dough:
    • Transfer the dough onto a floured surface.
    • Knead the dough for about 8-10 minutes until it becomes smooth and elastic. If the dough is too sticky, add a little more flour as needed.
  4. First Rise:
    • Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, turning it to coat all sides with oil.
    • Cover the bowl with a clean kitchen towel or plastic wrap and let the dough rise in a warm place for about 1-2 hours, or until it has doubled in size.
  5. Shape the Pitas:
    • Once the dough has risen, punch it down to release any air.
    • Divide the dough into 8 equal pieces and shape each piece into a ball.
    • On a lightly floured surface, roll out each ball into a circle about 1/4 inch thick.
  6. Second Rise:
    • Place the rolled-out dough circles on a lightly floured surface or baking sheet.
    • Cover them with a clean kitchen towel and let them rise for about 20-30 minutes.
  7. Grill the Pitas:
    • Preheat your grill to medium-high heat.
    • Place the pitas on the grill and cook for about 2-3 minutes on each side, or until they are puffed up and have nice grill marks.
    • If you prefer, you can also cook them in a cast-iron skillet or on a griddle over medium-high heat.
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