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voula_slat

Active member
I haven't made stuffed grape leaves in a while and I have some questions.

First of all, I am having a hard time judging how much filling to put in each leaf? I have a friend who helped me and tried to explain. She'd put a teaspoon of filling in the leaf, then add or subtract more after looking at it. She's quick rolling, and I have no idea how she knows how much filling.

And she really couldn't explain it - just said that you have to look at it and it's by feel. It sounds like my yiayia and she's younger than me! I told her that and she just shrugged. She tried to talk me through it as we were rolling together but it seemed so random to me.
 
About a teaspoon sounds right to me. Since rice is uncooked, room needs to be left for it to expand while cooking. Think it's better to use uncooked rice, as cooked rice would likely get mushy. It's probably better to under fill, as too much filling may open grape leaves.
 
Might I also add to what Luana said to roll the grapeleaves on the snug side but not too snug. When the filling expands, the grape leaf might burst. Cooked rice is not a good choice for this - one of my greatest kitchen disasters from cooking grapeleaves happened because of cooked rice. Don't use instant rice, either. That's just as bad as cooked.
 

Salt Cod in Greek Cooking?

How is salt cod, or Bakaliaros, used in Greek cooking? I remember my grandmother using it and I forget for what...

Could anyone share what specific dishes in Greek cuisine feature salt cod as the key ingredient? How is it typically prepared and served in Greece? Are there any traditional recipes or unique cooking methods that highlight the flavor and texture of salt cod in Greek cooking? I know a lot of other cultures use it, too.

I believe understanding the culinary uses of salt cod in Greece could offer deeper insights into the country’s culture and traditions. Plus, it would be great to try and replicate some of these dishes at home!

Greek Grilled Pita Bread - A Recipe

I love to grill - it's that time of year! I grilled some souvlaki the other day and decide to also make some pita bread. I had the dough all prepped. It came out great and tasted good with the souvlaki. Here's the recipe:

Ingredients:​

  • 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (plus extra for dusting)
  • 1 1/2 cups warm water (about 110°F)
  • 2 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

Instructions:​

  1. Activate the Yeast:
    • In a small bowl, combine the warm water, sugar, and yeast. Stir gently and let it sit for about 5-10 minutes until it becomes frothy.
  2. Prepare the Dough:
    • In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour and salt.
    • Make a well in the center of the flour and pour in the yeast mixture and olive oil.
    • Mix with a wooden spoon or your hands until the dough starts to come together.
  3. Knead the Dough:
    • Transfer the dough onto a floured surface.
    • Knead the dough for about 8-10 minutes until it becomes smooth and elastic. If the dough is too sticky, add a little more flour as needed.
  4. First Rise:
    • Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, turning it to coat all sides with oil.
    • Cover the bowl with a clean kitchen towel or plastic wrap and let the dough rise in a warm place for about 1-2 hours, or until it has doubled in size.
  5. Shape the Pitas:
    • Once the dough has risen, punch it down to release any air.
    • Divide the dough into 8 equal pieces and shape each piece into a ball.
    • On a lightly floured surface, roll out each ball into a circle about 1/4 inch thick.
  6. Second Rise:
    • Place the rolled-out dough circles on a lightly floured surface or baking sheet.
    • Cover them with a clean kitchen towel and let them rise for about 20-30 minutes.
  7. Grill the Pitas:
    • Preheat your grill to medium-high heat.
    • Place the pitas on the grill and cook for about 2-3 minutes on each side, or until they are puffed up and have nice grill marks.
    • If you prefer, you can also cook them in a cast-iron skillet or on a griddle over medium-high heat.

How do you use Lemon in Greek cuisine?

I know that lemons are common in Greek cuisine. I cook Greek all the time, and I use lemons a lot!

What are some traditional Greek dishes that you use lemons for? I am curious what people do. I tend to make a lot of ladolemono and use it to marinate meats. I also use it as a garnish all the time for both meats and vegetables like spinach, asparagus, etc.

I had thought all Greeks use lemon a lot, but I went over someone's house (Greek) and they didn't seem as into it as my family is...

Favorite Greek comfort foods?

I'm curious to know: what are your favorite Greek comfort foods?

Personally, I've heard a lot about moussaka and spanakopita, but I haven't had the chance to try them yet. Do you have any recommendations or recipes for these dishes? Or perhaps there are other less-known but equally delicious Greek comfort foods I should be aware of?

Looking forward to hearing your favorites and any tips you have for making or finding these comforting dishes!

Can you use frozen vegetables for Greek dishes?

There are two Greek dishes that I enjoy a lot and like to make a lot - fasolakia and the baked vegetables with the variety.

It's not always realistic for me to make them, though, because of the vegetable situation.

Is it okay to use frozen veggies? These are washed and chopped - they're basically ready to go - so it would save me a lot of time!

fasolakia-greek-food.jpg
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