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voula_slat

Active member
One of the most interesting Greek Christmas traditions to me is the one where people decorate boats. So, I started to research the history. Here's a bit of what I discovered:

The roots of the tradition of decorating boats in Greece for Christmas can be traced back to the country's longstanding ties with the sea. In Ancient Greece, people would often looked to the sea for both sustenance and inspiration, and it was not uncommon for ships to be adorned with religious symbols and decorations.

It also has ties to early Christianity in Greece. According to Greek Orthodox beliefs, Saint Nicolas (aka Santa Claus) was a sailor, and he is the patron saint of sailors. Decorating boats is often seen as a way to honor him.

Over time, this practice became associated with the Christmas season, and the boats began to be decorated specifically for the holiday.

People also make paper boats to decorate. Some call these the "yule boat" or karavaki. One of the most famous examples of this practice is the Yule boat, or karavaki.

The earliest known evidence of decorating boats for Christmas in Greece dates back to the 19th century. During this time, sailors would deck out their boats with lights and tiny boats. These tiny boats were often placed inside the larger boat, symbolizing protection from harm while at sea.

Does anyone have anything to add?
 
One of the most interesting Greek Christmas traditions to me is the one where people decorate boats. So, I started to research the history. Here's a bit of what I discovered:

The roots of the tradition of decorating boats in Greece for Christmas can be traced back to the country's longstanding ties with the sea. In Ancient Greece, people would often looked to the sea for both sustenance and inspiration, and it was not uncommon for ships to be adorned with religious symbols and decorations.

It also has ties to early Christianity in Greece. According to Greek Orthodox beliefs, Saint Nicolas (aka Santa Claus) was a sailor, and he is the patron saint of sailors. Decorating boats is often seen as a way to honor him.

Over time, this practice became associated with the Christmas season, and the boats began to be decorated specifically for the holiday.

People also make paper boats to decorate. Some call these the "yule boat" or karavaki. One of the most famous examples of this practice is the Yule boat, or karavaki.

The earliest known evidence of decorating boats for Christmas in Greece dates back to the 19th century. During this time, sailors would deck out their boats with lights and tiny boats. These tiny boats were often placed inside the larger boat, symbolizing protection from harm while at sea.

Does anyone have anything to add?
I love getting creative with my decorative boats! I just use any old paper that I have and make a ton of boats, and then decorate them to look festive. Does anyone else do this?
 

Cave Divers Capture Breathtaking Footage of Lake Vouliagmeni Tunnels.

Posting this takes me back to my years living in Ano Glyfada when I often wandered what and why was there a lake in Vouliagmeni!Underwander!
The season finale shows how there were once elephants living on the island of Crete, but, most importantly, it sees the team return to Lake Vouliagmeni, where they make yet another breakthrough.... Fascinating how our world and eachother are connected!👏🌍🌎🙏
https://greekreporter.com/2024/05/0...athtaking+Footage+of+Lake+Vouliagmeni+Tunnels

How did the Marshall Plan affect Greece?

I've recently taken an interest in the post-WWII recovery efforts and came across the Marshall Plan, which was introduced by the United States to aid European countries in rebuilding their economies. Given that Greece was significantly affected during the war, I'm curious about the specific impact the Marshall Plan had on Greece.

From what I've gathered, Greece, like many other European countries, faced tremendous economic challenges post-WWII, including infrastructure damage, inflation, and high unemployment rates. The Marshall Plan, formally known as the European Recovery Program, promised substantial financial aid to help rebuild war-torn nations, but I'm curious about how this plan was implemented in Greece specifically and what long-term effects it had on its economy and society.

I am so curious as to how, specifically, this plan affected Greece?

Learning about Greek Independence Day

March 25th marks a significant celebration in Greece, but I realize my knowledge on its historical context is quite limited.

From what I understand, this day commemorates the start of the War of Greek Independence in 1821, where Greece sought to end several centuries of Ottoman rule. However, I'm eager to learn more about the intricacies of this period, the key figures involved, and how the struggle for independence unfolded over time.

Additionally, I'd be interested in understanding how this day is celebrated across Greece today and whether any particular traditions are tied to it. For example, are there specific ceremonies, parades, or family traditions that uniquely mark this day in Greek culture?


Greek-flag.jpg

History of the Greek flag?

I never really stopped to think about the history of the Greek flag and I want to share that knowledge with my kids. I need to figure out what it is first. I have this feeling the history is rich because I've seen different, older versions of the flag.

Could anyone shed some light on the following aspects:
  • Origins: When was the Greek flag officially adopted, and were there any significant events that led to its creation?
  • Symbolism: What do the colors and the cross represent? Are there any historical or cultural significance behind these elements?
  • Evolution: Has the flag undergone any changes throughout the years? If so, what prompted these changes?
  • Legends/Myths: Are there any interesting legends or anecdotes surrounding the inception or adoption of the flag?
Thanks!

Learning about the Olympic Games

It's an Olympics year so I thought I would chat a bit about the Olympic Games!

The original Olympic Games, held in Olympia, Greece, were primarily a festival celebrating Zeus, the king of the Greek gods. These games began around 776 BC and featured a range of athletic competitions, from foot races to combat sports like wrestling and boxing. Interestingly, the games were so significant that wars were put on hold, and conflicts paused to allow athletes and spectators to travel safely to Olympia. This ancient tradition of the Olympic Truce or "Ekecheiria" is a testament to the power of sport in fostering peace and unity, a principle that remains at the heart of the Olympics today.

I find it absolutely intriguing how these ancient games laid the groundwork for the modern Olympics, introducing concepts of sportsmanship, excellence, and the idea of bringing people together through the universal language of sport.

Has anyone visited ancient Olympia? Do you guys enjoy watching the Olympic Games?
Share and discuss Greek history!

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