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dimi_pat

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I have been thinking abut the seasons and I bumped into Persephone. I find her story fascinating. Is she considered the goddess of springtime? I know that when she is with Hades that is when winter is, when she comes out from Hades to be with her mother, that is when the spring is. I had assumed it was Demeter's grief/joy that dictated the seasons, so I was a little surprised to read that Persephone was the goddess of spring, but perhaps that is true from the perspective that she represents spring?

With the change of seasons, I wonder which of the gods or goddesses represented this time of year. Do you guys know of any others that represent spring?
 
I have been thinking abut the seasons and I bumped into Persephone. I find her story fascinating. Is she considered the goddess of springtime? I know that when she is with Hades that is when winter is, when she comes out from Hades to be with her mother, that is when the spring is. I had assumed it was Demeter's grief/joy that dictated the seasons, so I was a little surprised to read that Persephone was the goddess of spring, but perhaps that is true from the perspective that she represents spring?

With the change of seasons, I wonder which of the gods or goddesses represented this time of year. Do you guys know of any others that represent spring?
My outlook in brief: Demeter is the grain-vegetation goddess. In the vegetable kingdom, reproduction is asexual -- by seeds/grains or spores. Demeter's young one [korE/kora/Cora] was abducted by Hades. Hence her grief etc. ... Zeus compromise: she is to share parts of the year with him and with her [springtime, flowering time]. In Hades, she is queen, and for unknown reasons, some Greeks identified her with an ancient and wild goddess, Persephone [Proserpina in Latin].
 
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My outlook in brief: Demeter is the grain-vegetation goddess. In the vegetable kingdom, reproduction is asexual -- by seeds/grains or spores. Demeter's young one [korE/kora/Cora] was abducted by Hades. Hence her grief etc. ... Zeus compromise: she is to share parts of the year with him and with her [springtime, flowering time]. In Hades, she is queen, and for unknown reasons, some Greeks identified her with an ancient and wild goddess, Persephone [Proserpina in Latin].
I didn't realize this! It's a fascinating story... seems like, in general, there is more to the story with some of these ancient myths than what we may realize. I didn't realize there was a time that Persephone and Demeter's child were two different beings.
 

Sad and Interesting Story of Prometheus

I find the story of Prometheseus to be sad and interesting and I wanted to share. Yes, I like to study Greek mythology - I find it so fascinating!

Prometheus, a Titan in Greek mythology, occupies a unique space in the pantheon of myths due to his intelligence and his profound impact on human civilization. His tale is one marked by valor, insubordination, and enduring punishment, a narrative that has fascinated scholars and enthusiasts for ages.

Prometheus, whose name aptly means "forethought", was known for his wisdom and for being a champion of mankind. Unwilling to see humans suffer, he committed a daring act of defiance against Zeus, the king of the gods, which would forever alter the course of human history.

The most famous aspect of Prometheus’ story involves him stealing fire from the gods and gifting it to humanity. Fire, in Greek mythology, represents more than just a means to warm food or fend off the darkness; it symbolizes knowledge, technology, and enlightenment—tools that would empower humanity to shape their world, for better or worse.

Zeus, infuriated by Prometheus' transgression, sentenced him to a severe and enduring punishment. Prometheus was bound to a rock, where each day an eagle, the emblem of Zeus, was sent to eat his liver, which would then regrow overnight, only for the torment to repeat ad infinitum. It was an eternal punishment for a being who, in many accounts, acted out of compassion and foresight.

I find it sad that he did something so beneficial to humanity but then got punished for it.

About Theogony by Hesiod

This poem has been one of my favorites for a while. I think everyone interested in Greek Mythology should read it! I thought I'd give you a summary:

Hesiod begins by invoking the Muses to guide him in recounting the story of the origins of the gods. He describes Chaos as the initial void from which the first gods emerged. From Chaos came Gaia (Earth), Tartarus (the Underworld), and Eros (Love), setting the stage for the creation of the cosmos.

Gaia gives birth to Uranus (the Sky), who becomes her husband and the father of the Titans, Cyclopes, and Hecatoncheires (Hundred-Handed Ones). Uranus, fearing the power of his offspring, imprisons them within Gaia's womb. Gaia urges her children to rebel, and her Titan son Cronus castrates Uranus, seizing power for himself.

Cronus becomes the ruler of the cosmos but fears a prophecy that one of his children will overthrow him. To prevent this, he swallows each of his children upon their birth, except for Zeus, who is saved by his mother Rhea and hidden away. Zeus grows up and defeats Cronus, establishing himself as the king of the gods.

The poem then describes the Titanomachy, the epic battle between Zeus and the Titans, which ends with the Titans' defeat and their imprisonment in Tartarus. Zeus and his siblings, the Olympian gods, become the rulers of the cosmos.

The narrative continues with the story of the Gigantomachy, the battle between the gods and the Giants, and other myths surrounding the gods' interactions with mortals and each other.

List of fun Greek mythology topics

I really love Greek Mythology. I thought I would share with you all some of my favorite topics:

  1. Birth of the Olympians and how they came to power
  2. Different heroes of Greek mythology
  3. 12 Labors of Hercules
  4. Trojan War
  5. Iliad and the Odyssey and all the stories in them
  6. The story of Persephone
  7. Pandora's box
  8. Different creatures - like the Minotaur and Hydra
What are yours?

Information about Chaos from Greek Mythology?

I’m currently delving into Greek mythology and have become particularly fascinated with the concept of Chaos. From what I understand, Chaos is often described as the primeval void or the initial state of the universe before the creation of the cosmos. However, I’m looking for more detailed information on this topic.

Could anyone provide insights or resources on the following?
  • What are the origins of Chaos in Greek mythology, and what role does it play in the creation myths?
  • Are there specific ancient texts or authors that provide the most comprehensive descriptions of Chaos?
  • How is Chaos symbolically represented in Greek mythology, and what does it signify in the broader context of ancient Greek culture and philosophy?
  • Resources that you can recommend so I can dive in...
Thanks so much!

Thoughts on Oedipus Rex?

recently finished reading Oedipus Rex by Sophocles, and I’m curious to hear what others think about this classic tragedy.

For those who haven't read it, the story revolves around Oedipus, the King of Thebes, who is determined to rid his city of a plague by discovering and punishing the murderer of the previous king, Laius. As he delves deeper into the investigation, he uncovers harrowing truths about his own identity and his inadvertent fulfillment of a prophecy that he would kill his father and marry his mother.

It was an interesting read, to say the least. What do you guys think of it?
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