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greggd12

Active member
This is one of my favourite Greek forms by the same as ancient Greek poet Aristotle. I always read it when I'm feeling lonely and in the mood for some inspiration. I remember first reading Aristotle when I was in high school, and I was always captivated by his words in his poems. To this day, so many years later, his words still ring true and I'm still moved by them. What are your favourite palms by Aristotle?


Hymn To Virtue by Aristotle

Virtue, to men thou bringest care and toil;
Yet art thou life's best, fairest spoil!
O virgin goddess, for thy beauty's sake
To die is delicate in this our Greece,
Or to endure of pain the stern strong ache.
Such fruit for our soul's ease
Of joys undying, dearer far than gold
Or home or soft-eyed sleep, dost thou unfold!
It was for thee the seed of Zeus,
Stout Herakles, and Leda's twins, did choose
Strength-draining deeds, to spread abroad thy name:
Smit with the love of thee
Aias and Achilleus went smilingly
Down to Death's portal, crowned with deathless fame.
Now, since thou art so fair,
Leaving the lightsome air.
Atarneus' hero hath died gloriously.
Wherefore immortal praise shall be his guerdon:
His goodness and his deeds are made the burden
Of songs divine
Sung by Memory's daughters nine,
Hymning of hospitable Zeus the might
And friendship firm as fate in fate's despite
 
This is a beautiful poem, thank you for sharing it!
 

Studying the Trojan War - Was it Real?

Did the Trojan War really happen? I am doing a bit of research and wanted to know what you guys thought:

The war is believed to have happened around 1200 BCE, and while there is no concrete evidence to support its occurrence, it is widely accepted as factual.

What is confusing me is how prevalent it is in Greek Mythology. In addition to the gods' involvement in the conflict, various stories and legends were added over time to give the tale more depth and drama. For example, the character of Achilles was said to be invulnerable except for his heel, which led to the phrase "Achilles heel" being used to describe a person's one weakness.

While some scholars once dismissed the Trojan War as pure myth, modern archaeological evidence has suggested that it may have been a real event. Excavations at the ancient site of Troy have revealed evidence of a long period of conflict and destruction, and historians have found similarities between the tale as it is told in ancient texts and what is known about the region's history at the time. While many details of the Trojan War are still shrouded in mystery, it seems increasingly likely that it was not just a legend but a real event that has been passed down through the ages.

Learning about the Spartan way of life

I find the Spartans fascinating. They seemed to have a different way of life!

The Spartans, known for their military might, also led a lifestyle that was remarkably disciplined and focused on simplicity.

The core of Spartan society was its military-oriented ethos. From a young age, Spartan boys were trained to be soldiers in the agoge, a rigorous education system that emphasized physical training, endurance, and survival skills. This preparation was not just about warfare but about creating individuals who were resilient, self-sufficient, and disciplined.

But Spartan discipline extended beyond the military sphere. Spartans lived a life of austerity and frugality that is quite alien to our modern way of living. Meals were simple, homes were unadorned, and luxuries were frowned upon. This was not out of a lack of resources but a deliberate choice to avoid softness and dependency on material comforts.

Interestingly, this Spartan simplicity also fostered a sense of equality among citizens. By eschewing luxury, Spartans aimed to reduce divisions within their society. Wealth and status were downplayed, while military prowess and moral integrity were valued above all.

What do you guys think about this or what can you add to my thinking?

History of the tradition of decorating boats for Christmas

One of the most interesting Greek Christmas traditions to me is the one where people decorate boats. So, I started to research the history. Here's a bit of what I discovered:

The roots of the tradition of decorating boats in Greece for Christmas can be traced back to the country's longstanding ties with the sea. In Ancient Greece, people would often looked to the sea for both sustenance and inspiration, and it was not uncommon for ships to be adorned with religious symbols and decorations.

It also has ties to early Christianity in Greece. According to Greek Orthodox beliefs, Saint Nicolas (aka Santa Claus) was a sailor, and he is the patron saint of sailors. Decorating boats is often seen as a way to honor him.

Over time, this practice became associated with the Christmas season, and the boats began to be decorated specifically for the holiday.

People also make paper boats to decorate. Some call these the "yule boat" or karavaki. One of the most famous examples of this practice is the Yule boat, or karavaki.

The earliest known evidence of decorating boats for Christmas in Greece dates back to the 19th century. During this time, sailors would deck out their boats with lights and tiny boats. These tiny boats were often placed inside the larger boat, symbolizing protection from harm while at sea.

Does anyone have anything to add?

Question about Greece during WWI

I am trying to learn more about Greek history. This is a family project! What I am learning about now is Greece's involvement in WWI. From what I've gathered, Greece had a rather complex and interesting stance during World War I, but I'm looking for more in-depth information.

Could anyone here provide insights or point me towards resources that detail:

  1. Greece's political climate leading up to its involvement in WWI.
  2. The significance of the National Schism and how it affected Greece's participation.
  3. Key battles or military campaigns that Greek forces were involved in.
Thanks so much!

Information About Alexander the Great

I have always been fascinated by Alexander the Great. I have this sense that depending on how you look at what he did, you could see it differently.

Sure, he conquered and spread hellenism. But what about the place he conquered? How did they feel? I am guessing not very favorable towards him.

If found this documentary on YouTube created by the history channel. I thought I'd watch it. I found it interesting and wanted to share.

Share and discuss Greek history!

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