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kcixcy

Active member
I love Pastitsio and I lost my family's recipe. I found a different recipe. What do you guys think of it? I have no recollection how my family makes it - I haven't made it yet.

Ingredients

For the Pasta

  • 1 1/2 cup of macaroni or penne pasta
  • 1 tablespoon of olive oil
  • 1 egg
  • 3/4 cup of freshly grated Kefalotiri or Parmesan cheese
  • A pinch of nutmeg

For the Meat Sauce

  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil
  • 1 pound of ground beef or lamb
  • 1/2 cup of red wine
  • 3 cups of tomato sauce
  • Salt and pepper to taste

For the Béchamel Sauce

  • 4 cups of milk
  • 1 cup of unsalted butter
  • 1 cup of all-purpose flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup of freshly grated Kefalotiri or Parmesan cheese
  • A pinch of nutmeg
Instructions

1. Cooking the Pasta​

Begin by cooking your pasta according to package instructions, aiming for it to be al dente. Drain and return to the pot. Toss with a drizzle of olive oil and allow it to cool slightly, ensuring the egg and grated cheese you'll soon add don't cook upon contact.

2. Preparing the Meat Sauce​

In a large pan, sauté the chopped onion in olive oil until soft. Add the ground meat, breaking it up and browning it. Pour in the wine and stir, letting the mixture simmer until the liquid has evaporated. Add the tomato sauce, season with salt and pepper, and let the sauce simmer for 15-20 minutes. Set aside.

3. Crafting the Béchamel Sauce​

In a saucepan, melt the butter over low heat. Whisk in the flour until smooth, and gradually add the milk, continuing to whisk. Increase the heat and bring to a boil, reducing it to a simmer. Cook and stir until thickened, which should take 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and let it cool slightly. Whisk the eggs and add to the sauce, along with the cheese and nutmeg.

 
I add a small amount of cinnamon to meat mixture, just barely able to taste. You don't want it to scream, cinnamon.
 
I add a small amount of cinnamon too - I eyeball it but I try not to drown it. I freshly grind the nutmeg so I only need a small amount. I recommend grinding your own, as well! The flavor is so much richer.
 
Oh no, losing a family recipe is always a bummer! Adding a touch of cinnamon and freshly ground nutmeg sounds intriguing; it's those little details that make a dish unforgettable. By the way, have you ever considered pairing your Pastitsio with a side of pico de gallo for a refreshing contrast?
 
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