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mj_toronto8

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I have been wondering, was the Trojan War real? I decided to explore the topic. I still don't know. What do you guys think?

Let's start with the basics. According to ancient Greek mythology, the Trojan War was fought between the Greeks and the Trojans over Helen of Troy. Helen, the wife of King Menelaus, was said to be the most beautiful woman in the world. When she was kidnapped by Paris of Troy, her husband called upon the Greek army to help him get her back. The war lasted ten years, according to the myth, and ended with the Greeks claiming victory when they used a wooden horse to get inside the walls of Troy.

It's easy to dismiss this story as nothing more than a legend, but there is some archaeological evidence that suggests that there may be some truth to the tale. In the 1870s, a German businessman named Heinrich Schliemann claimed to have found the site of ancient Troy in modern-day Turkey. He found evidence of a walled city with multiple layers of ruins, which might have been the result of multiple attacks over time. Whether or not this was the site of the Trojan War is still up for debate, but it's clear that Schliemann believed that he had discovered the home of king Priam and the legendary Trojan horse.

That said, not everyone agrees with Schliemann's findings. In fact, some scholars argue that the city he found wasn't actually Troy at all, but another nearby city with a similar name. Others point out that the ruins he found don't quite match up with the descriptions of the city in the Iliad. Additionally, there is evidence that suggests that the Trojan War didn't happen exactly as it was told in the myth. For example, it's possible that the conflict arose over economic disputes rather than the kidnapping of Helen.

Despite the disagreements among scholars, one thing is for sure: The Trojan War has had a lasting impact on culture and has become one of the most well-known stories from Greek mythology. It has been retold in countless books, movies, and TV shows over the years, and the characters from the story continue to inspire us today. The Trojan hero Hector, for example, has become synonymous with bravery, while Odysseus's journey home has been the inspiration for many other epic tales.
 
I am not sure. Troy was a real place I think but that's as far as I know.

I think there have been some excavation sites:

Troy I-VII and the Excavation Sites

Troy I, the earliest settlement, dates back to the Early Bronze Age, showing the city's humble beginnings. As the layers move upward, each phase of Troy's development becomes clearer, culminating in Troy VII, the city's final incarnation, which was dramatically destroyed. The enigmatic nature of its demise parallels the mythos of the Trojan War, leaving room for interpretation and speculation.

Unearthing Artifacts and Structures

What solidifies the reality of Troy is the physical tangible remains left by its inhabitants. From the imposing walls that once protected the city to the shards of pottery and tools used by its citizens, these artifacts are more than relics—they are touchstones to the past, offering a window into the daily lives of the Trojans and the events that shaped their world.
 

Summary of the Nine Muses of Greek Mythology

I've been studying about Greek Mythology and I bumped into some information about the 9 muses. I thought I would give a summary of who they are and what they represented. I feel like the Muses are often forgotten!

In Greek mythology, the Muses were goddesses who presided over the arts and sciences, inspiring creativity and knowledge in humans. There were originally nine Muses, each with her own domain of expertise. Here's a summary of who they were:
  1. Calliope: The Muse of epic poetry and eloquence. She was often depicted with a writing tablet or a scroll.
  2. Clio: The Muse of history. She was often depicted holding a scroll or a set of tablets, symbolizing the recording of historical events.
  3. Euterpe: The Muse of music, song, and lyric poetry. She was often depicted holding a flute or a double flute.
  4. Thalia: The Muse of comedy and bucolic poetry. She was often depicted with a comic mask, a shepherd's crook, or a wreath of ivy.
  5. Melpomene: The Muse of tragedy. She was often depicted holding a tragic mask and a sword or club.
  6. Terpsichore: The Muse of dance and choral poetry. She was often depicted holding a lyre and dancing.
  7. Erato: The Muse of love poetry and lyric poetry. She was often depicted holding a lyre and a wreath of roses.
  8. Polyhymnia: The Muse of sacred poetry, hymns, and eloquence. She was often depicted in a pensive or meditative pose, sometimes holding a finger to her lips.
  9. Urania: The Muse of astronomy and astrology. She was often depicted holding a globe and a compass, symbolizing the study of celestial bodies and their movements.
Together, the Muses served as sources of inspiration for poets, musicians, artists, and scholars, guiding and nurturing creative endeavors in ancient Greek culture.

muses-greek-mythology.jpg

Afterlife Beliefs in Greek Mythology?

What did Ancient Greeks believe about the afterlife? I've heard a few different stories... I'm particularly drawn to Ancient Greece's take on life after death.

Was there a uniform belief system, or did it vary significantly among different cities or periods? How did their beliefs influence their daily life and practices? I'm also curious about the role of mythological figures like Hades and the concept of Elysium.

If anyone has any expertise, recommended readings, or can point me to resources where I might be able to gather detailed insights into these spiritual aspects of Ancient Greek culture, I would greatly appreciate it.

Sad and Interesting Story of Prometheus

I find the story of Prometheseus to be sad and interesting and I wanted to share. Yes, I like to study Greek mythology - I find it so fascinating!

Prometheus, a Titan in Greek mythology, occupies a unique space in the pantheon of myths due to his intelligence and his profound impact on human civilization. His tale is one marked by valor, insubordination, and enduring punishment, a narrative that has fascinated scholars and enthusiasts for ages.

Prometheus, whose name aptly means "forethought", was known for his wisdom and for being a champion of mankind. Unwilling to see humans suffer, he committed a daring act of defiance against Zeus, the king of the gods, which would forever alter the course of human history.

The most famous aspect of Prometheus’ story involves him stealing fire from the gods and gifting it to humanity. Fire, in Greek mythology, represents more than just a means to warm food or fend off the darkness; it symbolizes knowledge, technology, and enlightenment—tools that would empower humanity to shape their world, for better or worse.

Zeus, infuriated by Prometheus' transgression, sentenced him to a severe and enduring punishment. Prometheus was bound to a rock, where each day an eagle, the emblem of Zeus, was sent to eat his liver, which would then regrow overnight, only for the torment to repeat ad infinitum. It was an eternal punishment for a being who, in many accounts, acted out of compassion and foresight.

I find it sad that he did something so beneficial to humanity but then got punished for it.

Mythological Roots of the Olympic Games

I've recently found myself deeply fascinated with how ancient myths and legends have influenced modern traditions and events, particularly those with a global following. Among these, the Olympic Games stand out as a prime example of ancient traditions influencing contemporary world culture. I'm eager to learn more about the mythological roots of the Olympic Games and thought this would be the perfect community to turn to for insights.

From what I understand, the origins of the Olympics are deeply intertwined with Greek mythology. The games were held in Olympia, a sanctuary site for Greek gods, and featured various competitions and rituals dedicated to Zeus, the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion. However, my knowledge of how these mythological aspects directly influenced the establishment and evolution of the Olympic Games feels quite superficial.

List of fun Greek mythology topics

I really love Greek Mythology. I thought I would share with you all some of my favorite topics:

  1. Birth of the Olympians and how they came to power
  2. Different heroes of Greek mythology
  3. 12 Labors of Hercules
  4. Trojan War
  5. Iliad and the Odyssey and all the stories in them
  6. The story of Persephone
  7. Pandora's box
  8. Different creatures - like the Minotaur and Hydra
What are yours?
Share and discuss Greek mythology!

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