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acamp7

Active member
The junta was a strong military dictatorship in the late 60's and early 70's in Greece. This was a very dark period for many Greeks, especially those who were socialist, communist, or anything leaning towards the left. The government also targeted anyone who was against the brutal dictatorship, even if they were not politically left leaning. These people would be hunted down by the military and locked up in jail or beaten or even killed. After the junta was dissolved, a democracy was established in Greece.
 
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Deborah

Member
I first went to Greece in July, 1974, mere days after the junta was overthrown. Only three of us exited the international flight in Athens; everyone else had departed in Rome. I will never forget the jubilance that permeated the air. People flocked to the outdoor cafes and exclaimed that they were finally able to speak freely. I will also never forget the Greek tradition of φιλότιμο (hard to define: incredible hospitality, the honor of treating someone as you would wish to be treated) that was extended to me then and also, to this very day. How easy it is to forget the lessons of history, but thank God for traditions like «φιλότιμο» that manage to survive no matter who’s in power or what’s going on in the world!
 

nadellii

Active member
I first went to Greece in July, 1974, mere days after the junta was overthrown. Only three of us exited the international flight in Athens; everyone else had departed in Rome. I will never forget the jubilance that permeated the air. People flocked to the outdoor cafes and exclaimed that they were finally able to speak freely. I will also never forget the Greek tradition of φιλότιμο (hard to define: incredible hospitality, the honor of treating someone as you would wish to be treated) that was extended to me then and also, to this very day. How easy it is to forget the lessons of history, but thank God for traditions like «φιλότιμο» that manage to survive no matter who’s in power or what’s going on in the world!
Very eerie. We have much to learn from out history. I'm glad you got to experience the joy from Greek directly after
 

k_tsoukalas

Moderator
I first went to Greece in July, 1974, mere days after the junta was overthrown. Only three of us exited the international flight in Athens; everyone else had departed in Rome. I will never forget the jubilance that permeated the air. People flocked to the outdoor cafes and exclaimed that they were finally able to speak freely. I will also never forget the Greek tradition of φιλότιμο (hard to define: incredible hospitality, the honor of treating someone as you would wish to be treated) that was extended to me then and also, to this very day. How easy it is to forget the lessons of history, but thank God for traditions like «φιλότιμο» that manage to survive no matter who’s in power or what’s going on in the world!
Fascinating that you were a witness to history like this. The Junta sounds like a brutal situation.
 

These are the best history museums in Greece

Greece has some of the best museums of history museums in the world! And amazing opportunities to see history up close in archaic relics like the Parthenon and Epidavros. These are the best history museums in my opinion, but please let me know your favorites!

- Acropolis Museum
- Heraklion Archeological Museum
- Museum of Byzantine Culture
- National Archeological Museum

48 years ago, Turkey invaded Cyprus

This is one of the saddest stories in Greek history. 48 years ago on July 15, 1974, Turkey invaded Cyprus and displaced and killed huge portions of the Greek populations and it continuously illegally occupies northern Cyprus to this day. To this day, there are abandoned Greek homes in Northern Cyprus that people are never able to return to. There is still a UN occupied border between Cyprus and Turkish occupied Cyprus, which is one of the only UN occupied borders left in the world.

The statue of Kolokotronis

Built in 1895, the statue of Kolokotronis stands in Athens near the public university. The statue was built in honor of him and his victory in the independence from the Ottoman Empire in liberating Greece. He is known as one of the most famous figures in Greek history, and one of the pivotal figures in creating the modern Greece that we know of today. There are many monuments of him all over the country, but the one in Athens is perhaps the most iconic. I recommend that you visit if you’re in the area.

Could the Parthenon marbles be returned to Greece?

There is finally some hope in the constant and ongoing battle to return the person on marbles from the United Kingdom to Greece. A new chairman has declared that there is a deal to be done in terms of the marbles. Many are very hopeful that this might be pointing to a potential return, but others have given up hope in this battle. personally, this is something that I would love to see. There are so many artifacts from around the world that are stolen and still being housed in museums in the United Kingdom. The right thing should be done, and the marbles should be returned, as should every other stolen artifact.

How Egypt influenced Ancient Greece

Ancient Egypt and Greece hav had so much influence over each other, perhaps more than any other ancient civilizations. This article specifically focuses on the impact of Egypt on Ancient Greece.
Share and discuss Greek history!

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