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dimi_pat

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I don't always have fresh dill on hand and I have trouble making it grow indoors... I like to make tzatziki and I love dill in that, and also in my spinach pie. Will it work to use dried dill? It doesn't have a very strong aroma, and I am trying to figure out if using dried dill is generally a bad idea, or if my dill is too old and needs to be thrown out. Has anyone here ever used dried dill? So far, I much prefer the fresh dill.
 
Haven't tried dried dill but I have tried frozen dill and it seems to work almost as well as fresh dill. Tip: next time you buy or find some dill, freeze some of it to use later.
 
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I don't always have fresh dill on hand and I have trouble making it grow indoors... I like to make tzatziki and I love dill in that, and also in my spinach pie. Will it work to use dried dill? It doesn't have a very strong aroma, and I am trying to figure out if using dried dill is generally a bad idea, or if my dill is too old and needs to be thrown out. Has anyone here ever used dried dill? So far, I much prefer the fresh dill.
Hi dimi_pat,

You can definitely use dried dill for your tzatziki sauce. The general rule for swapping dried for fresh herbs is to use 1/3 of the amount called for in the recipe. So let’s say the recipe calls for 1 tablespoons of oregano then you will use 1 teaspoons dried (1tbls = 3 tsp) Also you are right if you have your dried dill for a while it might have lost it potency.
 
I always use dried dill, to me it has much more flavor. Tried fresh dill once in something and truly disappointed, so always used dried, and it's easy to have on hand.

I have never used any measuring device for herbs or spices. Start with a small bit, you can always add more. If you prefer measuring that's fine, it's just I never saw anyone in my family cook that way with herbs or spices.
 
Haven't tried dried dill but I have tried frozen dill and it seems to work almost as well as fresh dill. Tip: next time you buy or find some dill, freeze some of it to use later.
I agree with this! I have frozen fresh dill before with good results.
 

Using Greek Yogurt in Cooking

I love eating Greek yogurt with a little honey and sometimes walnuts in the morning for breakfast. You an cook with it, too! I thought I'd make a list of some of my favorite ways to use it to share with you all. How do you like to cook with Greek yogurt?
  1. Marinades: Yogurt is a fantastic meat tenderizer. Mixing it with herbs and spices for a marinade not only imparts flavors but also ensures meats like lamb and chicken come out tender and juicy.
  2. Tzatziki: This classic Greek dip combines yogurt with cucumbers, garlic, salt, olive oil, and sometimes lemon vinegar or dill, creating a perfectly cool and refreshing side that pairs wonderfully with grilled meats.
  3. Baking: Yogurt can be added to cakes or pastries, providing moisture and a slight tanginess that complements the sweetness of the desserts.
  4. Soups: It’s also a thickening agent for traditional soups, adding a hint of tanginess and creaminess without overpowering the main ingredients.
  5. Sauces: Beyond tzatziki, yogurt serves as a base for various sauces, enhancing the flavors of vegetables and meats.

Using Kataifi Pastry Dough

I just watched a video somewhere (I lost track of where I saw it) on using kataifi pastry dough to make a spanakopita-like bite. I then watched another one on tiro pita using kataifi dough.

Honestly, I had never thought of this. I only just use it to make "kataifi". I thought I'd collect a list of ideas. Do you guys have any ideas?

  1. Kataifi Shrimp: Wrapping seasoned shrimp in Kataifi strands and baking until golden. It makes for a delightful appetizer that's crunchy on the outside with succulent shrimp inside.
  2. Kataifi Tarts: Using small molds to shape the Kataifi into tart shells, then filling them with either savory fillings like spinach and feta or sweet fillings like lemon curd or chocolate ganache.
  3. Spanakopita. Make the regular spanakopita filling but instead, roll it between sheets of kataifi. Can do the same with tiro pita filling/
What are your ideas? Maybe cheesecake roles? I am not sure how to accomplish that.

What is tsipouro?

Today, I'm curious to learn more about a Greek spirit that's caught my attention — Tsipouro. Often mentioned alongside other legendary beverages like Ouzo, Tsipouro seems to be a significant part of Greek culinary and social tradition, yet it doesn't seem to have the same international fame.

From what little I've gathered, Tsipouro is a strong distilled spirit made from grape pomace, the residue left after wine production. But my understanding barely scratches the surface. I am curious first of all if this is the same thing as Raki on Crete. Also, on Crete I had Raki with honey - can you do that with Tsipouro?

tsipouro-greek-spirit.jpg

Learning about Greek wines

Greek wines offer a window into the country's rich traditions. I have been taking the time to learn more about it lately!

Greek wine history dates back over 4,000 years, intertwined with myths and traditions where wine was celebrated as a gift from the gods. Today, Greece's unique climate, diverse soils, and indigenous grape varieties contribute to the production of wines with distinct character and quality.

Indigenous Varieties to Know:
  1. Assyrtiko: Originally from Santorini, this white grape is all about minerality, crisp acidity, and lemony flavors, making it a perfect companion for seafood.
  2. Agiorgitiko: One of the most important red varieties, primarily grown in the Peloponnese. It produces wines ranging from soft and fruity to full-bodied and age-worthy.
  3. Xinomavro: Often referred to as the "Barolo of Greece," this red grape from Northern Greece offers complex aromas and a strong tannic presence, ideal for aging.
  4. Moschofilero: A highly aromatic white variety, yielding wines that are fresh and floral with lively acidity, hailing from the cool-climate region of Mantinia.
  5. Retsina: While not a grape variety, no discussion on Greek wine can be complete without mentioning Retsina, a traditional white or rosé wine flavored with pine resin. A contemporary approach to Retsina has given it a much-needed makeover, making it an intriguing option worth revisiting.

Did I miss any wines? I am guessing I did...

greek-wine.jpg

What foods do you like to eat in Greece?

I thought I would make a list of all the foods I love eating in Greece. What are your favorites? Here's my list:
  • Saganaki - love this hot cheese dish!
  • Octopus (grilled) - I can't seen to find the good stuff outside of Greece.
  • Horta - love the mix of greens they use in Greece.
  • Fasolakia - the fresh ingredients make this stunning
  • Gyro - I love gyros in Greece the best
What do you love to eat in Greece?
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