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I have been making a lot of Greek cabbage salad. I thought I'd share my recipe:

Ingredients:

  • 1 medium head of green cabbage, thinly shredded
  • 1 large carrot, grated
  • 1 cucumber, halved lengthwise, seeds removed, and thinly sliced
  • 1 small red onion, halved and thinly sliced
  • 1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1/2 cup Kalamata olives, pitted and halved
  • 1/4 cup fresh parsley, finely chopped
For the Dressing:
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Instructions:
  1. In a large mixing bowl, combine the shredded cabbage, grated carrot, sliced cucumber, red onion, cherry tomatoes, Kalamata olives, and parsley. Toss gently to mix.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together the olive oil, lemon juice, salt, and pepper.
  3. Pour the dressing over the salad and toss to coat all the ingredients evenly.
  4. Let the salad sit for at least 10-15 minutes to allow the flavors to meld.
  5. Adjust seasoning with more salt and pepper, if needed.
  6. Serve in a large salad bowl or on individual plates and enjoy this refreshing and zesty Greek cabbage salad.
 
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Greek cabbage salad is a salad with cabbage and carrots. And even though it is an amazing salad, sometimes it can get a bit boring. That is why I find this recipe from axariotisxy yummy. I love it when a someone takes a recipe he likes and gets creative with it. That’s what cooking is all about being creative. axariotisxy thank you for sharing!
 
  • Like
Reactions: k_tsoukalas
Greek cabbage salad is a salad with cabbage and carrots. And even though it is an amazing salad, sometimes it can get a bit boring. That is why I find this recipe from axariotisxy yummy. I love it when a someone takes a recipe he likes and gets creative with it. That’s what cooking is all about being creative. axariotisxy thank you for sharing!

I agree - and sometimes I don't even do the carrots! Sometimes I just use cabbage. I kind of love how this recipe even has parsley in it. I can't imagine the tomatoes though, but I bet it will add a nice flavor and texture contrast. I am just not sure I ever would have thought of that myself!
 

What are your favorite vegetarian foods in Greek cooking?

Greek cooking is renowned for its \use of fresh herbs, vegetables, and grains, making it a paradise for those who prefer plant-based meals. Yet, when we think of Greek cuisine, dishes like gyros and souvlaki often take the spotlight. But there's so much more to Greek food than meat-centric dishes, and I'm on a quest to discover your favorite vegetarian delights that Greece has to offer!

From the creamy delicacies such as fava and tzatziki to hearty mains like gemista (stuffed tomatoes and peppers) and spanakopita (spinach pie), I'm eager to learn about the dishes you've fallen in love with. Perhaps you have a cherished recipe passed down through generations, a memorable meal from a trip to Greece, or even a favorite Greek vegetarian dish you've mastered at home.

Feel free to share your thoughts! My personal favorites are lentil soup, spanakorizo, and tzatziki (but this isn't a vegan choice)... I know some vegetarians can have dairy.

Thanks in advance!

What are 5 ingredients of Greek cuisine you can't live without?

I am working on stocking a better pantry for cooking Greek foods, but I thought I'd do something fun.

I would love it if you could share with me your top five staple ingredients for Greek cuisine and maybe a little but about why.

I am going to share mine to get things started:

1. Feta Cheese - Of course! Greek food wouldn't be the same.
2. Phyllo - I have learned that I won't make my own, so I have to keep it on hand.
3. Greek olive oil - I should have put this first! I can't live without olive oil lol
4. Greek oregano - I bring a bunch back from Greece or order it online when I run out. Nothing beats it!
5. Greek olives - I like to keep 2-3 different types on hand - I get these from a local Greek store.

What are your choices?

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Using Greek Yogurt in Cooking

I love eating Greek yogurt with a little honey and sometimes walnuts in the morning for breakfast. You an cook with it, too! I thought I'd make a list of some of my favorite ways to use it to share with you all. How do you like to cook with Greek yogurt?
  1. Marinades: Yogurt is a fantastic meat tenderizer. Mixing it with herbs and spices for a marinade not only imparts flavors but also ensures meats like lamb and chicken come out tender and juicy.
  2. Tzatziki: This classic Greek dip combines yogurt with cucumbers, garlic, salt, olive oil, and sometimes lemon vinegar or dill, creating a perfectly cool and refreshing side that pairs wonderfully with grilled meats.
  3. Baking: Yogurt can be added to cakes or pastries, providing moisture and a slight tanginess that complements the sweetness of the desserts.
  4. Soups: It’s also a thickening agent for traditional soups, adding a hint of tanginess and creaminess without overpowering the main ingredients.
  5. Sauces: Beyond tzatziki, yogurt serves as a base for various sauces, enhancing the flavors of vegetables and meats.

Corn Dishes from Greece

I noticed in Greece while I was there last that there is actually corn! Does it grow in Greece? I think I read somewhere that it grows in Northern Greece, but I have never been.

Does anyone know if there are some Greek traditional dishes that involve corn? I know that we can get street corn in the summer (and it's delicious), but I am not sure what Greeks would actually do with it. I am pretty sure it's not native to Greece, but I do see corn sometimes here and there on menus while in Greece.

Usually I am on the mainland when this happens, but like I said, I have never been to Northern Greece.

What is tsipouro?

Today, I'm curious to learn more about a Greek spirit that's caught my attention — Tsipouro. Often mentioned alongside other legendary beverages like Ouzo, Tsipouro seems to be a significant part of Greek culinary and social tradition, yet it doesn't seem to have the same international fame.

From what little I've gathered, Tsipouro is a strong distilled spirit made from grape pomace, the residue left after wine production. But my understanding barely scratches the surface. I am curious first of all if this is the same thing as Raki on Crete. Also, on Crete I had Raki with honey - can you do that with Tsipouro?

tsipouro-greek-spirit.jpg
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