1 - 12 of 12 Posts

amygdalE

Active member
or that they exist
 
I can't weigh in either way but I have been studying mythology lately and what has been on my mind is - the people who brought these stories to life (the Ancient Greeks) believed that the gods and goddesses exist. So... it has changed my perspective while reading about them!
 
If you are interested in learning about an alternative perspective on the gods, visit geographicalimagesofthegods.org. There I show how the ancients interpreted geographical imagery to create gods and myths.
 
If you are interested in learning about an alternative perspective on the gods, visit geographicalimagesofthegods.org. There I show how the ancients interpreted geographical imagery to create gods and myths.

I have already replied...... Sorry again; your perspective does not prove or disprove the existence of gods,
 
or that they exist
The question whether they exist or not is a philosophical question , which applies a fortiori [all the more] to the belief in one GOD, whether it is called ZEUS or simply THEOS. Update: Theodosius banished polytheism and, unwittingly, any theism. The Christian iconoclasts did the same. Why should we be concerned at all? [Sorry, if I am going beyond the bounderies of THIS mythology forum.]
 
I can't weigh in either way but I have been studying mythology lately and what has been on my mind is - the people who brought these stories to life (the Ancient Greeks) believed that the gods and goddesses exist. So... it has changed my perspective while reading about them!
they believed in deities for some reasons! they, i think, were not irrational believers.... i asked these questions to hear from contemporary Greek philosophers/thinkers -- you and you [reader]
 
Last edited:
Recently I learned that some modern Greeks tried to revive some ancient Gr. religion, e.g., the 2005 ELLINAIS [q.vide in WIKIPEDIA]. Maybe some of you know more about it: Do the members actually believe in some ancient gods, or are they lovers and commemorators of Hellenismos? // I love my recent internet discovery, the ruins of the temple of the Olympian Zeus in Athens.
 
I bet you these people can answer your questions. They look like they are setting up for an ancient ceremony. This was snapped on Filopapou hill on a full moon day.

Filopapou Hill Ceremony 2019s.jpg
 
I bet you these people can answer your questions. They look like they are setting up for an ancient ceremony. This was snapped on Filopapou hill on a full moon day.

View attachment 1168
Wow, that must have been a fascinating moment to witness!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Vangelis
I can't weigh in either way but I have been studying mythology lately and what has been on my mind is - the people who brought these stories to life (the Ancient Greeks) believed that the gods and goddesses exist. So... it has changed my perspective while reading about them!
The fact of belief does not imply that they exist and, as far as I know, nobody has ever constructed proofs. Timaeus, Aristotle, et al,
I can't weigh in either way but I have been studying mythology lately and what has been on my mind is - the people who brought these stories to life (the Ancient Greeks) believed that the gods and goddesses exist. So... it has changed my perspective while reading about them!
Belief is not proof..... Timaeus, Aristotle, et al., argued for some supreme god, unrelated to any ethnic god, for an abstract monotheism. THIS went well with Christian monotheism, which arose from blundering translators of the Hebrew Bible: Genesis-1 posits, as in the Cananite Ugarit, the ELOHIM [= GODS] , who decided to produce Man in their own image -- one male and one female; whereas Genesis-2 posits one male god, YAHWEH, who produced ADAM out of clay and breathed life into it. The translators used THEOS for both the Elohim and Yahveh -- a linguistic monism.


















1
 
I love my recent internet discovery, the ruins of the temple of the Olympian Zeus in Athens.
I was lucky enough one year to have my room upgraded at the Royal Olympic Hotel to a massive room with a view to the temple of Olympian Zeus. Every morning I would wake up and open my curtain to this view (also, small tip, go to google maps and hover your cursor over the icon of the temple of Zeus to see a 360 view):

Temple of Zeus small.JPG
 
  • Like
Reactions: amygdalE
While it may be impossible to prove the gods have never existed, if geographicalimagesofthegods.org demonstrates that many myths concerning the gods are based on the interpretation of geographical imagery, what might that tell us about the gods?
 

Greek God or Goddess About Cooking?

I've recently been diving into mythology and am particularly fascinated by Greek mythology. I was wondering, are there any Greek gods or goddesses associated with cooking or cuisine?

I know the Greeks had gods and goddesses for various aspects of life, and I'm curious if the culinary arts were represented in any way. Thanks in advance!

Story of Prometheus and Fire?

've recently been digging into some Greek mythology, and I stumbled upon the fascinating tale of Prometheus. His story really piqued my interest, but I'm left wanting to know more details and different interpretations.

From what I understand, Prometheus was a Titan who defied Zeus by stealing fire and giving it to humanity. This act of rebellion had huge consequences, not only for him but also for mankind. I'm particularly interested in the following aspects:
  • The Role of Prometheus: Why did he decide to steal fire for humans? What motivated him to go against the gods?
  • Consequences: What were the immediate and long-term repercussions of his actions for both Prometheus and humanity?
  • Symbolism: How is Prometheus' story interpreted in different cultural or philosophical contexts? What does his tale symbolize in modern times?
Thanks for your help! This is for a research project I am doing.

Furies of Greek Mythology?

I've been reading a lot about ancient Greek mythology recently, and I came across the Furies. They seem like fascinating figures, but I'd love to learn more about them. Can anyone explain who the Furies were and what role they played in Greek mythology?

From what I understand, they were known to be vengeful spirits or deities, but I'm curious about their origins, specific myths they appear in, and how they were perceived by the ancient Greeks. Did they have any particular significance or symbolism?

Afterlife Beliefs in Greek Mythology?

What did Ancient Greeks believe about the afterlife? I've heard a few different stories... I'm particularly drawn to Ancient Greece's take on life after death.

Was there a uniform belief system, or did it vary significantly among different cities or periods? How did their beliefs influence their daily life and practices? I'm also curious about the role of mythological figures like Hades and the concept of Elysium.

If anyone has any expertise, recommended readings, or can point me to resources where I might be able to gather detailed insights into these spiritual aspects of Ancient Greek culture, I would greatly appreciate it.

Understanding the Goddess Hera's Jealousy

I've been delving into Greek mythology recently, and one aspect that continually piques my interest is the jealousy of Hera, the queen of the gods. Hera's jealousy, particularly towards Zeus's numerous affairs and their resulting offspring, is a recurring theme in many myths.

I'm curious to hear your thoughts and interpretations on this. Why do you think Hera's jealousy is so prominently featured in these stories? Is it meant to reflect certain human qualities or societal norms of the time? Or is there another symbolic reason behind it?

Additionally, how do you think Hera's jealousy shapes her interactions with other characters and the overall narrative of Greek myths? Does it add a layer of complexity to her character, or does it serve more as a plot device?
Share and discuss Greek mythology!

WorldwideGreeks.com is a free online forum community where people can discuss Greek food, travel, traditions, history and mythology.
Join Worldwide Greeks here!

JOIN COMMUNITY FOR FREE

LOGIN TO YOUR ACCOUNT
Back
Top