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kosta_karapinotis

Active member
I have been studying more about Greek mythology lately and I bumped into information about the Muses. It seems like there is some conflicting information, especially regarding their names and functions. It could just be that there's not a lot online.

Can anyone recommend a good source to get Information about them, or maybe even a book I can read?
 
The Complete World of Greek Mythology by Richard Buxton is pretty good but honestly, I can't remember how much they covered the muses. I know what you mean, there isn't much out there.
 
I have been studying more about Greek mythology lately and I bumped into information about the Muses. It seems like there is some conflicting information, especially regarding their names and functions. It could just be that there's not a lot online.

Can anyone recommend a good source to get Information about them, or maybe even a book I can read?
Sorry I don't know about such a book. Many years ago I learned in an encycl. that probably the muses originally were natural or agricultural deities or nymphs. Today I agree, as I can see from some names. E.G., THALEIA (or thaliE) means BLOSSOMING.
The naming was obviously done from an esthetic standpoint, since some of their names were also given to the 3 graces. [All myths, say I, start from perceptual experiences.] // the muse euterpE, as in euterpes = well-pleasing, charming. [Lyddell lexicon] // kalliopE [<kallos...], beautifully voiced ,,,,,































































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Afterlife Beliefs in Greek Mythology?

What did Ancient Greeks believe about the afterlife? I've heard a few different stories... I'm particularly drawn to Ancient Greece's take on life after death.

Was there a uniform belief system, or did it vary significantly among different cities or periods? How did their beliefs influence their daily life and practices? I'm also curious about the role of mythological figures like Hades and the concept of Elysium.

If anyone has any expertise, recommended readings, or can point me to resources where I might be able to gather detailed insights into these spiritual aspects of Ancient Greek culture, I would greatly appreciate it.

Thoughts on Oedipus Rex?

recently finished reading Oedipus Rex by Sophocles, and I’m curious to hear what others think about this classic tragedy.

For those who haven't read it, the story revolves around Oedipus, the King of Thebes, who is determined to rid his city of a plague by discovering and punishing the murderer of the previous king, Laius. As he delves deeper into the investigation, he uncovers harrowing truths about his own identity and his inadvertent fulfillment of a prophecy that he would kill his father and marry his mother.

It was an interesting read, to say the least. What do you guys think of it?

12 Olympian Gods and Goddesses

I love mythology and I thought I'd make list of the 12 Olympian Gods and Goddesses. This is my best guess. Do you know that I have seen different versions of this? What do you think?
  1. Zeus: The king of the gods, ruler of the sky and thunder, and the god of law, order, and justice.
  2. Hera: The queen of the gods, Zeus's wife and sister, and the goddess of marriage and childbirth.
  3. Poseidon: The god of the sea, earthquakes, and horses, often depicted with a trident.
  4. Demeter: The goddess of agriculture, fertility, and the harvest, responsible for the cycle of life and death in crops.
  5. Athena: The goddess of wisdom, warfare, strategy, and crafts, often associated with strategic warfare and civilization.
  6. Apollo: The god of music, poetry, prophecy, healing, and archery, known for his wisdom and beauty.
  7. Artemis: The goddess of the hunt, wilderness, childbirth, and virginity, often depicted with a bow and arrows.
  8. Ares: The god of war, violence, and bloodshed, embodying the brutal aspects of conflict.
  9. Aphrodite: The goddess of love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation, born from the sea foam and known for her irresistible charm.
  10. Hephaestus: The god of fire, blacksmiths, craftsmen, and volcanoes, renowned for his skill in metalworking.
  11. Hermes: The messenger of the gods, associated with travel, commerce, communication, and trickery.
  12. Dionysus: The god of wine, fertility, ecstasy, and theatre, representing the joyous aspects of life and celebration.
greek-gods.jpg

Information about Chaos from Greek Mythology?

I’m currently delving into Greek mythology and have become particularly fascinated with the concept of Chaos. From what I understand, Chaos is often described as the primeval void or the initial state of the universe before the creation of the cosmos. However, I’m looking for more detailed information on this topic.

Could anyone provide insights or resources on the following?
  • What are the origins of Chaos in Greek mythology, and what role does it play in the creation myths?
  • Are there specific ancient texts or authors that provide the most comprehensive descriptions of Chaos?
  • How is Chaos symbolically represented in Greek mythology, and what does it signify in the broader context of ancient Greek culture and philosophy?
  • Resources that you can recommend so I can dive in...
Thanks so much!

Question about the Fates of Greek Mythology

I am helping someone gather information for a school project on Greek Mythology so your input is much appreciated. This is more like, to help the person know enough information to be able to research it.

The project is about the Fates. These mysterious beings, often depicted as three sisters—Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos—were believed to control the destiny of every mortal and god alike. Their thread-spinning, measuring, and cutting symbolized the weaving of each individual's life, from birth to death.

But what exactly was the extent of their power? How did they interact with other gods and mortals? These questions have sparked endless fascination and speculation among scholars and enthusiasts alike.

Were the Fates merely impartial observers, executing predetermined destinies without interference? Or did they possess agency, actively shaping the lives of those they governed? Furthermore, what implications did their existence hold for concepts of free will and determinism in ancient Greek thought?
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