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redsoxdw_

Member
This article is saying that Koulouri comes from an Ancient Greek word "kollikon"


That's all I've got for now. This is an interesting discussion!
I don't know about the actual word, but it seems the food came from early Christian times "Some historians trace the Koulouri's origins back to early Christianity and during Byzantine years is when it is said to have first appeared in Constantinople. It then became popular in Thessaloniki, when the Greeks from Asia Minor brought it to the Macedonian city around 1922." from https://greekcitytimes.com/2021/06/18/koulouri-greece-breakfast-recipe/
 

lalajess

New member
I don't know about the actual word, but it seems the food came from early Christian times "Some historians trace the Koulouri's origins back to early Christianity and during Byzantine years is when it is said to have first appeared in Constantinople. It then became popular in Thessaloniki, when the Greeks from Asia Minor brought it to the Macedonian city around 1922." from https://greekcitytimes.com/2021/06/18/koulouri-greece-breakfast-recipe/

No matter where the word came from, I think they're delicious. The article is right, this is one of my favorite breakfasts while in Greece!
 

kosta_karapinotis

Active member

amygdalE

Member
No matter where the word came from, I think they're delicious. The article is right, this is one of my favorite breakfasts while in Greece!
Thank you for all the information that is provided. As you know and speak modern Greek, I accept the use of the word "koulouri", which I even see witten on the vendor's sign, and I grant that Byzantine writings declare that it is derived from the classical word "kollikion". However, I'd like to make these clarifications: What the Byz. writings imply is that"kollikion" was a classical word. By looking at it, I see that it is the diminutive of Kollix ( the word I mentioned that is attested in classical Greek lexicons and was defined as a round loaf or roll made of of coarse ground grains; the diminutive word was undoubtedly formed from the adjective *kollik[ios] + -ion. I also noted earlier that the noun had different beginnings in different dialects, namely OY- or O-. So, Kollikion = a small roll ...., which in my Italic dialect was simply called Koulloura. The tradition survives in the making of olive oil bread rolls:
I take "koulouria" as a generic/collective term that originally was "kouloureia" but could have been also the name of individual items. Good stuff!
 
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Learn Greek vocabulary words related to time!

This is for sure to come in handy when in Greece :)

  • Time – η ωρα – i ora
  • Watch – το ρολόι – to roli
  • Clock – το ρολό – to roli
  • Daylight Savings Time – η θερινή ώραI therini ora
  • Time Difference – η διαφορά ώρας – I diafora oras
  • Time Zone – ζώνη ώρας – zoni oras
  • Set my watch one hour back – γυρίζω το ρολόι μου μία ώρα πίσω – yirizo to roli moo mia ora piso
  • Set my watch one hour ahead –γυρίζω το ρολόι μου μία ώρα μπροστά – yurizo to roli moo mia ora brosta
  • Do you have the time? έχεις / έχετε ώρα; Ehees (informal)/ Ehete (formal) ora;
  • Excuse me, do you have the time? Συγγνώμη, μήπως έχετε ώρα; signori, boros ehete ora?
  • Yes, it is 20:05. Ναι, είναι οκτώ και πέντε.Ne, eenai okto kai pende.
  • What time is it? τι ώρα είναι; To ora eenai;
  • It is (five) o’clock – είναι (πέντε) η ώρα eenai pence I ora – It is (five) o’clock.
  • To be punctual – είμαι ακριβήςeemai akrithis
  • To stand someone up – στήνω κάποιον – stono kapion
From https://www.greekboston.com/learn-speak/vocabulary-time/

Polling the streets: Who is the most famous Greek?

This is quite interesting

Beautiful Greek/English pop song: Fotia by Evangelia

I just discovered this song even though it was released 1 year ago, its so beautiful

Are there any Greek comic books?

My cousin is a huge comic book nerd and I would love to get him some comic books in Greek. Any recommendations?
Share and discuss Greek traditions related to Greek weddings, christenings, dance & holidays!

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