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seleanor

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Beans are so healthy and versatile, and there are so many Greek recipes where beans are the star of the dish! These are my top recipes, but I'm sure there are many more that I do not know of. Please add more in the the thread!!

- Gigantes (baked white beans with tomato sauce)
-Fava bean spread (boiled and mashed fava beans with lemon and olive oil)
-Fakes (simple lentil soup with onions and tomatoes, garnished with vinegar and olive oil)
 
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Fasolada
 
Beans are so healthy and versatile, and there are so many Greek recipes where beans are the star of the dish! These are my top recipes, but I'm sure there are many more that I do not know of. Please add more in the the thread!!

- Gigantes (baked white beans with tomato sauce)
-Fava bean spread (boiled and mashed fava beans with lemon and olive oil)
-Fakes (simple lentil soup with onions and tomatoes, garnished with vinegar and olive oil)
Thank you for writting about these wonderful bean dishes. What I remember in Greece, extra big lima beans were used for "Giantes" which means in English giants. From my expierence in Greece, fava is made with yellow split peas and cooked and prepared as you write. I think fava beans are called koukia in Greece and have to be shelled when you buy them fresh from the farmers market. What I remember about preparing them was you had to boil them for a long time and then you had to dump the water because it was toxic? Then re-boil them. But I'm not sure about that. I do remember eating them with local olive oil and fresh squeezed local lemons. A gastronomic heaven
 
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Thank you for writting about these wonderful bean dishes. What I remember in Greece, extra big lima beans were used for "Giantes" which means in English giants. From my expierence in Greece, fava is made with yellow split peas and cooked and prepared as you write. I think fava beans are called koukia in Greece and have to be shelled when you buy them fresh from the farmers market. What I remember about preparing them was you had to boil them for a long time and then you had to dump the water because it was toxic? Then re-boil them. But I'm not sure about that. I do remember eating them with local olive oil and fresh squeezed local lemons. A gastronomic heaven
Yes exactly, when making lentils you need to boil them for a few minutes first, dump out the water, rinse them, and then start cooking them again.
 
Beans are so healthy and versatile, and there are so many Greek recipes where beans are the star of the dish! These are my top recipes, but I'm sure there are many more that I do not know of. Please add more in the the thread!!

- Gigantes (baked white beans with tomato sauce)
-Fava bean spread (boiled and mashed fava beans with lemon and olive oil)
-Fakes (simple lentil soup with onions and tomatoes, garnished with vinegar and olive oil)
I love all of these! Sooo good. A lot of my family "Fava" recipes for some reason use yellow split peas. I know that they aren't the same thing... Maybe it was an issue of availability of ingredients back when they came over... almost 100 years ago now.
 

Current food trends in Greece?

I understand that Greece is just like other countries where there might be food trends, new dishes, etc to enjoy.

I'm looking to understand more about the latest trends that are currently shaping it. I'm particularly interested in how traditional Greek recipes are being reimagined by modern chefs, how regional variations are gaining popularity, or if there's a rise in any particular ingredients or cooking methods.

Is anyone here keeping tabs on contemporary movements in Greek food? Maybe you've dined at a restaurant that surprised you with a modern twist on a Greek classic, or you've come across new food blogs with innovative recipes.

The cuisine of Greece is as much about the traditional recipes we all love as it is the trends and the way the cuisine moves forward!

Making traditional loukaniko question

I’m on a culinary quest to master the art of making Loukaniko, the traditional Greek sausage that tantalizes taste buds with its savory blend of spices and herbs. I understand that each region and even each family might have their own special recipe passed down through generations.

Which leads me to my ask - could anyone who’s familiar with Greek cuisine share insights about the most common seasonings used in Loukaniko? I'm especially interested in any mix of spices that gives it that characteristic flavor profile.

I’ve done some preliminary research, but I’m looking for that firsthand knowledge. What's the blend that makes your Loukaniko stand out? Are there any particular secrets to perfect the authentic taste?

How to learn about different regional cuisines in Greece?

I have learned so much about Greek cuisine by being on this forum! I know that there are standard recipes that everyone seems to cook.

For example, you can get souvlaki all over. Everyone seems to serve a village salad with slight variations. Most regions seem to make moussaka. There are tons of others.

I have also noticed that each region has their own specialties. How do you go about learning about them?

greek-salad.jpg

Best Greek Wine Regions?

I'm on a quest to discover the finest vineyards Greece has to offer. With a winemaking history that spans over four millennia, it has a rich wine tradition even though a lot of people don't know much about it.

I'd love to hear from anyone who has explored Greek wine regions or from connoisseurs who have a particular fondness for Greek varieties. What regions should I place at the top of my list, and are there any specific vineyards or wines that are absolute must-trys?

From the famed Santorini Assyrtiko to the bold reds of Nemea, I'm eager to taste and learn about the exceptional flavors and story behind each bottle. Whether it's a little-known gem or an iconic estate, I'm all ears for your recommendations.

Can you make your own rusks?

I love Cretan Dakos!
There's something about the combination of the crunchy rusk soaked with the juice of ripe tomatoes, topped with fresh cheese and olive oil, that has me hooked!

However, given that I live in an area where it's challenging to find authentic Cretan rusks, I'm contemplating on whether I can bake my own at home. I'm curious if anyone here has attempted to make rusks suitable for dakos from scratch.

I know I can order then online. I tried this, and they didn't survive the shipping too well.
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