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kcixcy

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I get a bit confused about the influences and relationship between these two civilizations. How did they impact eachother?
 
I don't know much, but I do know that there is evidence on Crete from the Minoan excavations that the Minoans had trade contact with Ancient Egypt. Some goods of Egyptian origin have been found at dig sites.
 
I don't know much, but I do know that there is evidence on Crete from the Minoan excavations that the Minoans had trade contact with Ancient Egypt. Some goods of Egyptian origin have been found at dig sites.
This is from a blog post that I found "Egyptians and Greeks are known to have been in contact already in the 2nd millennium BC, though we don’t know much about it. The picture becomes clearer from about 600BC, when the sea-faring Greeks were frequent visitors to Egypt. Some of it was for trade (there was a Greek trading-base at Naucratis in Egypt from about this time), some of it was about military services, and some of it was probably just sightseeing. By the 5th– 4th centuries BC Greek intellectuals had a pretty good idea of Egyptian culture." https://blog.oup.com/2016/04/greek-egyptian-interactions-literature/
 
This is from a blog post that I found "Egyptians and Greeks are known to have been in contact already in the 2nd millennium BC, though we don’t know much about it. The picture becomes clearer from about 600BC, when the sea-faring Greeks were frequent visitors to Egypt. Some of it was for trade (there was a Greek trading-base at Naucratis in Egypt from about this time), some of it was about military services, and some of it was probably just sightseeing. By the 5th– 4th centuries BC Greek intellectuals had a pretty good idea of Egyptian culture." https://blog.oup.com/2016/04/greek-egyptian-interactions-literature/
This is interesting, thank you for sharing this!
 
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There might be some information in this article?

 
I don't know much, but I do know that there is evidence on Crete from the Minoan excavations that the Minoans had trade contact with Ancient Egypt. Some goods of Egyptian origin have been found at dig sites.
Good! At the same time, look closely at the Egyptian art-works in chamber-tombs. Many statuettes that protect royal sarcophagi are clearly of Caucasian females or spirits. Many wall-painted females are Caucasian and are attired in Minoan style. Painted male dignitaries are skin-bronzed but not negroid. The painted negroid people are either soldiers or house-maids. All this abolishes the myth that an African is a negroid person. The very face of the Sphynx is Caucasian. We need to rewrite the history of Egypt. Herodotus recorded what some people used to believe, not an empirical ethnology/
 

History of the tradition of decorating boats for Christmas

One of the most interesting Greek Christmas traditions to me is the one where people decorate boats. So, I started to research the history. Here's a bit of what I discovered:

The roots of the tradition of decorating boats in Greece for Christmas can be traced back to the country's longstanding ties with the sea. In Ancient Greece, people would often looked to the sea for both sustenance and inspiration, and it was not uncommon for ships to be adorned with religious symbols and decorations.

It also has ties to early Christianity in Greece. According to Greek Orthodox beliefs, Saint Nicolas (aka Santa Claus) was a sailor, and he is the patron saint of sailors. Decorating boats is often seen as a way to honor him.

Over time, this practice became associated with the Christmas season, and the boats began to be decorated specifically for the holiday.

People also make paper boats to decorate. Some call these the "yule boat" or karavaki. One of the most famous examples of this practice is the Yule boat, or karavaki.

The earliest known evidence of decorating boats for Christmas in Greece dates back to the 19th century. During this time, sailors would deck out their boats with lights and tiny boats. These tiny boats were often placed inside the larger boat, symbolizing protection from harm while at sea.

Does anyone have anything to add?

My Top Favorite Greek Philosophers

There are too many philosophers to count, but these are the ones I am studying at the moment. It's fascinating to me how influential the Greek philosophers are. Here's some things I am learning:

#1 Socrates

If philosophy had a poster boy, Socrates might very well be it. The father of Western philosophy, Socrates was a gadfly to Athenian society, questioning everything and Master to Plato. Known for the Socratic Method and his unflinching commitment to truth, Socrates' influence is immeasurable despite never having written a word.

#2 Plato

Rightly succeeding his mentor on this list, Plato's Academy saw him birth the first "university" of its kind. His unabashed idealism, immortal Forms, allegories like the Cave, and the pursuit of 'The Good' in moral philosophy set the stage for much intellectual discourse.

#3 Aristotle

Aristotle, another of Plato's students, had a more grounded approach to philosophy than his predecessor. With establishing principles of logic and reason, and contributions to virtually every field of academia, from poetry to physics, Aristotle's body of work remains foundational.

#4 Heraclitus

Heraclitus, famed for the idea that "change is the only constant," viewed the cosmos through a lens of process, flux, and an everlasting Logos that governs the world. Although little of his work survives, his influence on ancient and modern thinkers is profound.

#5 Epicurus

Known for his eponymous philosophy, Epicurus taught that the greatest good is to seek modest pleasures in order to attain a state of tranquility, freedom from fear (ataraxia), and absence of bodily pain (aponia). Often misunderstood, Epicureanism is starkly different from the modern use of 'epicurean' - it's much less about a luxury lifestyle and more about ethical considerations regarding personal fulfillment.

Documentary about Ancient Greece

I love to watch documentaries about Ancient Greece. I find a lot of content on YouTube but some of it was just created by users and I am not sure the credibility of the sources.

I watched this one recently and wanted to share - it is from the History Channel:

Information About Alexander the Great

I have always been fascinated by Alexander the Great. I have this sense that depending on how you look at what he did, you could see it differently.

Sure, he conquered and spread hellenism. But what about the place he conquered? How did they feel? I am guessing not very favorable towards him.

If found this documentary on YouTube created by the history channel. I thought I'd watch it. I found it interesting and wanted to share.

What did the Ancient Greeks eat?

I am fascinated by the Ancient Greeks. I have a feeling that some of our modern Greek recipes are similar to the ancient ones. Like spoon sweets. It think that seems like something that was developed a long time ago as a way to preserve the fruit harvest.

So, I have been researching this. What did the Ancient Greeks eat? I wanted to share this video because I thought it was interesting.

Share and discuss Greek history!

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