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ssherie_

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I am sooo curious...are there any languages that have similarities to Greek? I know that Greece doesn't derive from another language, but does anyone who speaks another language have an easier time learning Greek?
 

ellinasgolfer0320

Active member
Spanish is similar with the conjugation of verbs, so Spanish speakers can pickup on it a bit quicker than others... Greek is a difficult language because there isn't a specific place in a sentence where you need to place objects. As a simple example, I can say - "είσαι καλά;" which means "are you well?" Or I can say "καλά εισαι;" and it will have the same meaning. Not many languages allow you to change the position of words in a sentence and allow it to have the same meaning - i.e. there is no strict order in which you have to put your words in Greek.

Greek - mila(o) - i speak
Spanish - habl(o) - i speak
Greek - mil(as) - you speak
Spanish- habl(as) - you speak...
Greek - mil(am)e - we speak
Spanish - habl(am)os - we speak
Greek - mil(an)e - they speak
Spanish - habl(an) - they speak

Spanish is easier than Greek though because it only has 2 genders whereas Greek has 3, and Spanish doesn't have 9 declensions of words.
 
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seleanor

Member
Spanish is similar with the conjugation of verbs, so Spanish speakers can pickup on it a bit quicker than others... Greek is a difficult language because there isn't a specific place in a sentence where you need to place objects. As a simple example, I can say - "είσαι καλά;" which means "are you well?" Or I can say "καλά εισαι;" and it will have the same meaning. Not many languages allow you to change the position of words in a sentence and allow it to have the same meaning - i.e. there is no strict order in which you have to put your words in Greek.

Greek - mila(o) - i speak
Spanish - habl(o) - i speak
Greek - mil(as) - you speak
Spanish- habl(as) - you speak...
Greek - mil(am)e - we speak
Spanish - habl(am)os - we speak
Greek - mil(an)e - they speak
Spanish - habl(an) - they speak

Spanish is easier than Greek though because it only has 2 genders whereas Greek has 3, and Spanish doesn't have 9 declensions of words.
This is an excellent analysis :) I also always wondered why Spanish and Greek sound a little similar. Do you have a background in languages/linguistics??
 

ellinasgolfer0320

Active member
This is an excellent analysis :) I also always wondered why Spanish and Greek sound a little similar. Do you have a background in languages/linguistics??
I'm trilingual (English, Greek, and Spanish)
 
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greek_ggirl

Active member
Spanish is similar with the conjugation of verbs, so Spanish speakers can pickup on it a bit quicker than others... Greek is a difficult language because there isn't a specific place in a sentence where you need to place objects. As a simple example, I can say - "είσαι καλά;" which means "are you well?" Or I can say "καλά εισαι;" and it will have the same meaning. Not many languages allow you to change the position of words in a sentence and allow it to have the same meaning - i.e. there is no strict order in which you have to put your words in Greek.

Greek - mila(o) - i speak
Spanish - habl(o) - i speak
Greek - mil(as) - you speak
Spanish- habl(as) - you speak...
Greek - mil(am)e - we speak
Spanish - habl(am)os - we speak
Greek - mil(an)e - they speak
Spanish - habl(an) - they speak

Spanish is easier than Greek though because it only has 2 genders whereas Greek has 3, and Spanish doesn't have 9 declensions of words.
I also picked up Spanish pretty quick when I was learning it in high school. The accent is very similar too
 
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amygdalE

Member
The root of a word expresses the meaning of the word, whereas your grammatical endings express only Mood, Tense, and Persons. To understand or to speak Greek, one needs, above all, to understand roots. I see no affinity between MILA- and HABL-.. Hence, without the English translations, a Spaniard will not understand what "Milao" means. Sorry.
As for the order of words, inflected languages (like classical Greek or Latin, Middle English, etc., ) present no semantic problems. No problem here: Him she called but received no reply ana Zeu.
 
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amygdalE

Member
I am sooo curious...are there any languages that have similarities to Greek? I know that Greece doesn't derive from another language, but does anyone who speaks another language have an easier time learning Greek?

I am sooo curious...are there any languages that have similarities to Greek? I know that Greece doesn't derive from another language, but does anyone who speaks another language have an easier time learning Greek?
The similarities (and, hence, dissimilarities) can be of various types, wherefore there can be different difficulties in learning [understanding, speaking, and even writing] a language or Greek in particular. SIMILARITIES in grammatical endings [morphology];
in words [lexikon] or word-roots; in syntax [formation of compound words, or of sentences into a discourse/Logos]; and in peculiar/ethnic idiomatic expressions; in diction or pronunciation [phonetics]; and in orthography. // Lexical study: If two words from two languages are similar in sound and in meaning, they are said to be affine (kindred) or cognate, and most likely, one of the words derives from the other. My manuscript, still unpublished, "Indo-European and Its Speakers" presents the etymology of many words from Greek (Proto-Greek) -- words of Latin, Akkadian, Etruscan, Basque, Anglo-Saxon, Eblaite (Canaanite), etc.
 
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dubai_suzie

Active member
The root of a word expresses the meaning of the word, whereas your grammatical endings express only Mood and Persons. To understand or to speak Greek, one needs, above all, to understand roots. I see no affinity between MILA- and HABL-.. Hence, without the English translations, a Spaniard will not understand what "Milao" means. Sorry.
As for the order of words, inflected languages (like classical Greek or Latin, Middle English, etc., ) present no semantic problems. No problem here: Him she called but received no reply ana Zeu.
Hmmm maybe its different grammatically but just familiar or sounds similar? I don't know too much about languages, I'm jus guessing here
 

dubai_suzie

Active member
Hmmm maybe its different grammatically but just familiar or sounds similar? I don't know too much about languages, I'm jus guessing here
I just read your next comment, makes sense now with the kindred words, thanks! :)
 

ellinasgolfer0320

Active member
The root of a word expresses the meaning of the word, whereas your grammatical endings express only Mood and Persons. To understand or to speak Greek, one needs, above all, to understand roots. I see no affinity between MILA- and HABL-.. Hence, without the English translations, a Spaniard will not understand what "Milao" means. Sorry.
As for the order of words, inflected languages (like classical Greek or Latin, Middle English, etc., ) present no semantic problems. No problem here: Him she called but received no reply ana Zeu.
No, a Spaniard won't understand it, and I was not trying to show that the root of the words are similar but if I were then I would have picked a verb like goustaro (γουστάρω) and gustar which have the same roots - both of these words mean "to like". What I was showing was that the conjugations are similar in the present tense, which is why emphasized the ending.
 
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kosta_karapinotis

Active member
No, a Spaniard won't understand it, and I was not trying to show that the root of the words are similar but if I were then I would have picked a verb like goustaro (γουρστάρω) and gustar which have the same roots - both of these words mean "to like". What I was showing was that the conjugations are similar in the present tense, which is why emphasized the ending.
That makes a lot of sense to me. The languages may not come from the same root, but it isn't like Greek and Mandarin for example
 

ellinasgolfer0320

Active member
Found this today

 
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dubai_suzie

Active member
Found this today

Makes total sense, finally someone is putting it into words with perfect examples!! Phonology is the idea everyone was looking for I guess :) Thanks for sharing
 

Greeks have their own halloween!

Greeks don't celebrate halloween like they do in the US and around the world. Greeks have another holidays called "apokries" which is celebrated ten weeks before Greek Orthodox Easter. Everybody dresses up in costumes and there is usually a parade in the street. So don't expect to see much on October 31, even though there are some western celebrations now a days.

Polling the streets: Who is the most famous Greek?

This is quite interesting

Seahorse Dragging A Mask' Underwater Photographer Nikos Samaras!👌

I didn't know where to post this!.... This photo should win more awards globally.....one of the best I have seen this year!

Giannis Antetokounmpo meets with Greek prime minister!!

I loved watching Giannis throughout the playoffs and im so happy that he's getting the recognition he deserves!! And meeting with the prime minister, how cool :) I think it will be very helpful to have Giannis as a cultural ambassador to Greece in the US

Learn Greek vocabulary words related to time!

This is for sure to come in handy when in Greece :)

  • Time – η ωρα – i ora
  • Watch – το ρολόι – to roli
  • Clock – το ρολό – to roli
  • Daylight Savings Time – η θερινή ώραI therini ora
  • Time Difference – η διαφορά ώρας – I diafora oras
  • Time Zone – ζώνη ώρας – zoni oras
  • Set my watch one hour back – γυρίζω το ρολόι μου μία ώρα πίσω – yirizo to roli moo mia ora piso
  • Set my watch one hour ahead –γυρίζω το ρολόι μου μία ώρα μπροστά – yurizo to roli moo mia ora brosta
  • Do you have the time? έχεις / έχετε ώρα; Ehees (informal)/ Ehete (formal) ora;
  • Excuse me, do you have the time? Συγγνώμη, μήπως έχετε ώρα; signori, boros ehete ora?
  • Yes, it is 20:05. Ναι, είναι οκτώ και πέντε.Ne, eenai okto kai pende.
  • What time is it? τι ώρα είναι; To ora eenai;
  • It is (five) o’clock – είναι (πέντε) η ώρα eenai pence I ora – It is (five) o’clock.
  • To be punctual – είμαι ακριβήςeemai akrithis
  • To stand someone up – στήνω κάποιον – stono kapion
From https://www.greekboston.com/learn-speak/vocabulary-time/
Share and discuss Greek traditions related to Greek weddings, christenings, dance & holidays!

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